Edinburgh Napier University

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Libraries Week 2022

Libraries Week 2022

Libraries Week is an annual event held to celebrate the best that libraries have to offer. This year, Libraries Week takes place between the 3rd and 9th of October and will focus on the vital role libraries play in supporting individuals of all ages to access lifelong learning.

As part of Libraries Week, Edinburgh Napier Libraries and the University’s Special Collections are offering tours of the War Poets Collection led by our Special Collections Curator, Laura Cooijmans-Keizer.

The War Poets collectionLibraries week 2022

War Poets Collection 

It was at Craiglockhart War Hospital during the First World War, that Wilfred Owen (1893-1918) and Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967) first met and where some of their greatest poetry was inspired and written. As a tribute to these and other WWI poets, the University established the War Poets Collection in 1988, on the 70th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice. Since then, the collection has grown to include other histories, incorporating items from the building’s first establishment as a Hydropathic – the predecessor of a modern Spa – up to its current use as a campus of Edinburgh Napier University.

If you’d like to come along and learn more about this fascinating collection, Laura will be providing 30-minute tours of the War Poets Exhibition at Edinburgh Napier University’s Craiglockhart campus on the 6th and 7th of October. The exhibition provides a glimpse into the daily lives of the poets, patients, and medical staff at Craiglockhart during the time when the building was used as a war hospital. The collection features contemporary photographs, books, film, audio, and memorabilia, and offers visitors a unique insight into the important personal, social, and medical achievements that occurred within the walls of Craiglockhart War Hospital.

Book a tour

To book a place on one of the tours visit our Training and Events Calendar.

You can read previous blog articles on the War Poets Collection:

The Poet and the Doctor, Craiglockhart War Hospital 1917 (War Poets Collection)

War Poets Collection: Remembering Siegfried Sassoon

Visit our website to find out about all our Special Collections. (put links in here to website – napier.ac.uk not working just now)

By Sarah Jeffcott

What has changed over Summer at the Library

What has changed over Summer at the Library

This post is to update returning students on changes to the Library over the Summer

We hope you had a great summer and enjoyed the break from your studies. We wanted to update you on what has changed in our campus libraries for the new academic year.

All covid-19 restrictions have been lifted. This means you no longer need to wear a face covering in the library, but please feel free to do so if you will feel safer.  There are no longer any social distancing measures. So we have removed seat covers and cross stickers from desks, meaning all study spaces are available for use. We are still providing hand sanitisers throughout the libraries.

Group study rooms are back to normal capacity, although we would recommend advance booking using Resource Booker to ensure you get the room and time slot you prefer.

We will be resuming library tours at the beginning of term.

If you are visiting Craiglockhart campus you will see that we have removed unused bookshelves to create more study spaces and a larger relaxation space.

Here’s a reminder of our continuing services:

Our self-service kiosks are available so you can borrow and return books even when helpdesks are closed.

Lapsafes are still available for laptop loans and returns during campus opening hours.

Our Click and Collect service will continue to allow you to request books which can be picked up during campus opening hours from the Click and Collect shelves.

The inter library loan service is still available if you would like to access materials which Edinburgh Napier does not stock.

Remember all payments for fines, postal loans and print credit are made online.

Library opening hours can be viewed here.

 

If you have any questions, you can contact the library at any time.

We look forward to seeing you all again in September!

Want more information on the library? Read our article on Library welcome week here

By Vivienne Hamilton

The War Poets Collection: Siegfried Sassoon and Dr Brock

The War Poets Collection: Siegfried Sassoon and Dr Brock

We greatly value the Library’s War Poets Collection, housed at our Craiglockhart campus, and this week we’d like to highlight two anniversaries connected with the Collection. Read on to find out more about The War Poets Collection: Siegfried Sassoon and Dr Brock.

Siegfried Loraine Sassoon

Siegfried Loraine Sassoon was born in Kent on 8th September 1886 and signed up for active service on the very day the UK declared war on Germany – 4th August 1914. Sent to the Western Front, he soon earned himself the nickname “mad Jack”, such was his exceptional and reckless bravery on the battlefield. In fact, Sassoon’s actions were so inspiring that he was awarded the Military Cross in 1916.

Nevertheless, Sassoon developed a bitter and abiding opposition to the War and was threatened with court-martial for writing an anti-war declaration that was read out in Parliament. Afterwards, he was sent to Craiglockhart, then a military psychiatric hospital, for treatment for what was then known as shell shock.
It was at Craiglockhart that Sassoon met fellow poet Wilfred Owen in 1917. Through mutual encouragement, their poetry flourished, and today they’re regarded as two of the greatest artists to emerge from World War I.

Sassoon survived the Great War and continued writing for the rest of his life. We have copies of his collected poems which you can access by logging into LibrarySearch

John Arthur Brock

Local lad, John Arthur Brock was born on the 9th of September 1878 in Kirkliston, just outside Edinburgh. After qualifying as a medical doctor, he worked for spells in Vienna and Berlin before returning to his native city.

Dr Brock was one of the doctors who treated the soldiers at Craiglockhart Hospital for shellshock, or neurasthenia as he called it. The characteristics of neurasthenia, he believed, were “dissociation, disintegration and split personality” and the way to treat it was holistically, specifically by reintegrating patients with their environment and restoring community links. This often meant hard physical work.

In volume 60 (2005) of the Journal of the history of medicine and allied sciences, David Cantor quotes Siegfried Sassoon remembering that Dr Brock “pushed his patients out of bed in the dark cold mornings and marched them out for a walk before breakfast. Rumour has it that they bolted themselves into lavatories and bathrooms (the bolts had been removed) but he was wise to that”. (Department of Documents, Imperial War Museum, London).

Brock retained a life-long interest in the treatment of psychiatric illnesses. In 1925 he moved to North Queensferry and established a convalescent home for nervous patients.

The War Poets Collection further Information

To find out more about The War Poets Collection: Siegfried Sassoon and Dr Brock, visit the collection online on our special collections website. You can also visit the collection at our Craiglockhart Campus, but please check access times in advance.

Read more about the War Poets on our blog:

War Poets Collection: Remembering Siegfried Sassoon

The Poet and the Doctor, Craiglockhart War Hospital 1917 (War Poets Collection)

Let’s leave the last words of this piece to Sassoon:

Does it Matter?
Does it matter – losing your legs?…
For people will always be kind,
And you need not show that you mind
When the others come in from hunting
To gobble their muffins and eggs.

Does it matter – losing your sight? …
There’s such splendid work for the blind;
And people will always be kind,
As you sit on the terrace remembering
And turning your face to the light.

Does it matter – those dreams from the pit? …
You can drink and forget and be glad,
And the people won’t say that you’re mad;
For they’ll know that you fought for your country
And no-one will worry a bit.

Collected Poems 1908-1956, Faber & Faber, 2002.

By Lesley McRobb

International Literacy Day

International Literacy Day

International Literacy Day was originally founded by UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) and raises awareness of illiteracy globally.

Reading and writing are essential for our everyday lives, such as navigating signs, news, menus, and even labels on food. There are challenges with illiteracy, as approximately 771 million people still lack basic reading and writing skills.

UNESCO is holding a hybrid event and awards ceremony to remind everyone of the importance of literacy: You can find more information here

 

But what can be done to support literacy?

 

· Governments, schools, and communities can participate in activities to focus on illiteracy.

· Books can be donated to libraries and offer tuition to support success and development.

· Discussions, group sessions and 1-to-1s.

 

This year the theme is ‘transforming literacy learning spaces’ and at Edinburgh Napier University, we want to show how important spaces can be to ensuring inclusive education for everyone. For example, our group study rooms on resourcebooker.napier.ac.uk in the library provide a comfortable space for collaborative and group discussions, as well as technical equipment that can support development with researching and writing for dissertations and assignments.

 

What is the result of literacy?

Increasing literacy also gives people skills for employment with opportunities to develop and break the cycle of poverty, through small steps. It also provides people with knowledge and communication to express feelings and emotions.

 

You can find articles and books via the library search:

https://napier.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/44NAP_INST/19n0mho/cdi_gale_infotrac_456490000

https://napier.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/44NAP_INST/n96pef/alma9920385460102111

Our academic skills advisers are also here to help you on your university journey!

 

Further resources:

https://www.unesco.org/en/days/literacy-day https://nationaltoday.com/international-literacy-day/

Welcome to the Library 2022

Welcome to the Library 2022!

A warm welcome from all staff at Edinburgh Napier University Library! Whether you are a new or returning student. Here is some useful information to help you make the most of the Library service.

The Introduction to Computing and Library Services module on Moodle is an excellent starting point. It aims to give you the information you need to get started with Library and IT services when you first arrive at University.

Library induction sessions

During the first four weeks of Trimester 1, we’ll be providing physical tours of the library and online sessions to introduce you to the library services.

The Welcome to the Online Library session will show you how to find ebooks and e-journals using LibrarySearch. Also where to find specialist academic databases, and how to use LibrarySearch to organise your reading and searching faster.

The Welcome to the Physical Library – In-person tours will take place in each of our campus libraries, Merchiston, Craiglockhart and Sighthill. In these tours, we will take you around your campus library and tell you useful information such as how to connect to Eduroam, how to use printer/scanners, self-service checkouts and laptop loan safes, how to search for and find books, and how to book the group study rooms. There will also be online sessions covering the same topics for those unable to make the physical library tours.

See the Training Calendar to book a place on one of the online sessions or the in-person tours.

My Napier Library webpages

Information on all the services the Library provides can be found on the My Napier Library Webpage.  This includes useful information such as Library opening hours, how to get started searching for and borrowing books, using the Click and Collect service, how to order Inter-Library Loans, and finding information relevant to your subject area using the Subject Guides.

Searching for Library resources

LibrarySearch is the quickest and easiest way to search across our three libraries for the books and online resources you require. You can find many ebooks and subscription resources online without leaving your home.

Contact us

We are here to answer your Library questions. Come and visit us in person, or call us on 0131 455 3500, email the Library, or follow us on our socials, Instagram and Twitter.

So Welcome to the Library 2022, we look forward to seeing you soon!

By Sarah Jeffcott

 

 

 

 

Bridges of Scotland

Bridges of Scotland

On the 30th of August, it will be 5 years since the Queensferry Crossing opened. If you have ever travelled to Fife and beyond by car then you will have crossed it! This lifeline artery was built as a replacement for the old Forth Road Bridge which was beginning to suffer from corrosion in the suspension cables. This resulted in a loss of strength with weakening calculated to accelerate. This would result in traffic restrictions to limit loading and would impact heavily on tourism, logistics and commuting from Fife, Perth, Aberdeen, Dundee and the Highlands. In 2007 Transport Scotland decided to proceed with a replacement bridge. Known as the Forth Replacement Crossing, the bridge was finally named in 2013 following a public vote with Queensferry Crossing receiving the most votes. Scotland has many interesting and attractive bridges and here are a few you may be interested in:

Sluggan Bridge

Remote from a town or village this tall bridge over the River Dulnain seems quite out of place to modern eyes, but at one point this was part of General Wade’s military road and a vital crossing. Originally the crossing was merely a ford, but a two-arch bridge was built in the 1760s. This was swept away in a flood in 1829 and was replaced in the 1830s with the single-span bridge you can see now. Major repairs were carried out to the bridge in 2001/02 by Sustrans as part of the National Cycle Network Route 7. Sluggan Bridge is category A listed and a scheduled monument. The Wade Road is an ancient right of way.

Craigellachie Bridge

This elegant bridge spanning the River Spey is the oldest surviving iron bridge in Scotland. Built between 1812 and 1815 it was designed by the world-famous engineer Thomas Telford. Telford allowed for floods and the bridge withstood a major flood in 1829 when the Spey rose by 4.7 meters. The spandrels are formed of diamond lattice to form a delicate design. The castellated towers that decorate the abutments are hollow with false arrow slits. The bridge, with minor modifications, continued in use until 1963–64 and was bypassed and closed to vehicles in 1972 when its pre-stressed concrete replacement just downstream, was opened. Craigellachie Bridge is now an outstanding historical and scenic amenity used by pedestrians and cyclists.

Forth Bridge

This iconic bridge is sometimes referred to as the Forth Rail Bridge, but that’s not its official name. It spans the Forth estuary carrying the railway lines connecting the north and south of Scotland, and when it opened it was the world’s longest single-span cantilever bridge. The first design to be approved for a rail bridge across the Forth was by Thomas Bouch. This design was abandoned following the Tay Bridge disaster because that bridge had also been designed by Bouch. In the end, the design by John Fowler and Benjamin Baker was chosen and the bridge opened in 1890. At the busiest point in construction, 4000 men were employed; unfortunately, 57 men died. The bridge carries 200 trains each day and 3 million passengers each year. In 2015 the bridge was designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in its 125th anniversary year.

Skye Bridge

The short 500m crossing between Skye and the Scottish mainland was made by ferry until the Skye Bridge opened in 1995. The bridge is a concrete arch supported by 2 piers and it is 2.4 km long with the main arch being 35m high. Although the bridge is free to cross now, this was not always the case. The bridge was built with private rather than government funding. This meant that the private company that owned the completed bridge could charge a toll to cross it. This charge applied to locals and tourists alike which meant that whenever an islander needed to access services or visit family on the mainland, they had to pay the toll. A campaign group SKAT (Skye and Kyle Against Tolls) was set up and in 2004 the Scottish Government purchased the bridge and abolished the tolls. The bridge has made Skye much more accessible and in recent years this has caused a large increase in tourism due to exposure on tv programmes promoting the outdoors and the historical fantasy series Outlander. Islanders now complain of rubbish being dumped, busy roads and erosion of paths due to the large numbers visiting Skye.

Scotland’s newest bridge-Lossiemouth East Beach Bridge

The town of Lossiemouth in Moray relied heavily on fishing and when the industry fell into decline in the 1970s the town began to rely on tourism. There are many lovely walks and interesting attractions to visit in the area, but the town’s biggest asset is the several miles long sandy East Beach. With pristine sands and a large dune system, the beach was well used by tourists and in recent years supported a surf school. But in order to get to the beach, the estuary of the River Lossie had to be crossed. Access was by an old wooden bridge and in 2019 a member of the public reported hearing a loud crack as they crossed it. The bridge was surveyed, and it was decided it was a risk to the public, so it was permanently closed. This was devastating to local tourism with shops and hospitality businesses reporting large falls in trade and cancellations of bookings. The estimated collective annual cost of closure was £1.5 million. However, help was to come from an unexpected source. When the Covid-19 pandemic struck in 2020, the UK government put financial help packages in place for hotels, restaurants and shops across the country. This ensured that Lossiemouth’s businesses were protected not only from the effects of the pandemic but from the loss of its biggest tourist attraction.

Meanwhile a tendering process was carried out and eventually, preparation works for a new bridge began in November 2021. The new bridge was completed in April 2022 and was officially opened in May. If you would like to see the bridge, beach and do some people watching, then click here.

 

You can use Library Search to find books and articles on more bridges of Scotland, bridge construction and tourism pressures.

By Vivienne Hamilton

International Dog Day

International Dog Day

How can we not celebrate Internation Dog Day, when we already celebrated International Cat Day?  Everyone knows Librarians love cats. But we are an open-minded and inclusive lot here at Edinburgh Napier and our homes are open to not just fluffy felines but delightful dogs too!

So come meet a couple of our Staff’s Dogs

Dogs of the Library

First up is Bertie. Bertie’s human is Keith our Business school subject Librarian. Learn more about your subject librarians here. Bertie is 9 and a half and is a bearded/border collie. His hobbies include chasing squirrels at the park and barking at seagulls (and anything else really…). He loves being outside, sleeping in the garden, climbing hills, going for a dook in the sea and carrying sticks.  He’s also a big softy who likes getting his tummy rubbed. Dislikes include fireworks and he is always unsure after he’s had his haircut. Aren’t we all Bertie?

International Dog Day Dog Bertie

Our next woof is Luna. Luna is part of Vivienne’s animal team, along with Smudge and Tigger the cats. She is a chihuahua/Jack Russell cross and is a rescue dog. She enjoys a good peer out of the window to check out what is going on and eating her food. Sounds like she knows what she likes. She doesn’t like Smudge so much sadly, but we can’t all like everyone so fair enough Luna.

International Dog Day Dog Luna

And finally, it is my honour to introduce the newest member of the dog club here at the Library, Tess. Tess is shown pensively looking into the distance contemplating the inherent tragedy of the squeaky chew toy (perishing in fulfilling its purpose — why, oh why?). Tess is a Soft-coated Wheaten Terrier, eleven years old, she is very excitable and loving, enjoys eating chicken slices and receiving lower back scratches above all else. Dislikes include thunder, postal services of all kinds, and, of course, cats (both the species and the musical). Thanks to Rob for letting us know about the wonderful Tess. She sounds like quite a character!

International dog day dog tess

So there is a quick snapshot of a few of the gorgeous pups our Librarians are lucky enough to have.

You can learn more about animals and Veterinary medicine by using Librarysearch.napier.ac.uk

Not a Dog person? Prefer our feline friends? Check out our article on Cats of the Library here.

By Juliet Kinsey (and the wonderful pet people of the Library)

Edinburgh Napier University Library Tours

Edinburgh Napier University Library Tours

Are you ready for Super September? We are! We librarians love September. In fact, it’s our favourite month, because it brings our students back and oh, how we miss you during the long summer vacation. So why not join us for an Edinburgh Napier University Library tour!

We can’t wait to reconnect with some familiar faces and welcome many new ones. We’d like to invite you to come and visit us, either in person or virtually, and allow us to introduce ourselves and our services.

It’s never too early to hone your information retrieval skills. The sooner you’re acquainted with your library resources, the easier it’ll be for you when you have to start on your first written assignments. So, come and find us and let us show you what we can offer you.

We’ll be running our library tours on Tuesdays and Thursdays for the first four weeks of Trimester 1.

In these short, friendly sessions, we’ll introduce our physical spaces at all three campuses, our print and electronic resources collections, explain how to borrow and request items, general pc and wifi usage, how to borrow laptops, and a whole range of other library services. See here for more details:

Library Introduction Sessions (napier.ac.uk)

Scheduled Tours

To book a scheduled library tour, please click on the link below.

Calendar – Home – Edinburgh Napier University

But if these times don’t suit you, you can also book another time from early September. We’ll have a booking form ready for our unscheduled tours in early September. It’ll be called “Personalised library tour” and you’ll be able to click on and book a session. When the page is live, you’ll find it on the library forms page in our self-service portal, Unidesk:

https://napier.unidesk.ac.uk

We look forward to meeting as many of you as possible as soon as possible.

About the Library (napier.ac.uk)

By Lesley McRobb

Are you a returning student? Find out what has changed in the Library over the summer here.

Japanese Manga Art

Japanese Manga Art

What is Manga?

Manga is Japanese comics, and graphics, in newspapers, magazines and books, that emerged in the 1920s. The word consists of ‘man’, ‘whimsical’ and ‘pictures. Manga demonstrates stories of characters through pictures and expressive lines. It is usually printed in black and white due to cost savings; however special editions are printed in colour.

 

 

Comic style strip of Manga

Manga comic at Merchiston Library

 

History:

Although Manga emerged during the 20th century, the earliest association was found on scrolls created by Japanese, Buddhist monks in the 12th century. They depicted chapters of animals mirroring human gestures. Printing techniques flourished in the 19th century and Manga focused on politics, although the government censored artists and even closed publishers.

Post-World War II, American occupation of Japan influenced the style, so it became more animated and entertaining for readers. These were called ‘Red Books’ and have influenced more contemporary pictures and stories today that suggest emotions and actions.

 

Manga Genres:

The Manga sub-genres consist of romance, fantasy, horror, and adventure. The most popular and modern classics are Naruto, Sailor Moon, Dragon Ball Z, Fruit Basket, and Bleach. A lot of other Manga has been satirical and can focus on darker areas like corruption and injustices.

As Manga is mainly comic books, they have also become ‘anime’ meaning animations in Japanese. Anime uses movement to explain complex stories.

 

 

Image of Bleach character Manga

Bleach

 

 

So, if you are ready to read Manga, you may find that the print copies are not your usual way of reading as traditionally it is read back to front, from the top right to the left!

 

You can find Manga resources from how to master the art of drawing Manga to Bleach via the Library Search.

We even have clips available on the Library’s Box of Broadcasts.

Please let us know if you have any recommendations for the library!

 

Other resources:

https://www.carnegielibrary.org/an-introduction-to-manga/

https://blog.britishmuseum.org/an-introduction-to-manga/

World Lion Day

World Lion Day

Today’s celebrations come to us from Big Cat Rescue. World Lion Day is celebrated to raise awareness and support for their protection and conservation. It was started in 2013 by Dereck and Beverly Joubert to celebrate these legendary animals (nationaltoday.com)

 

Lions are the second largest cat in the world, they can weigh between 300 and 550 pounds. They used to roam all over Africa and the Eurasian continent. But now it is estimated that there are only 30 000 and 100 000 lions left (daysoftheyear). World Lion Day was started in 2013 by Dereck and Beverly Joubert to bring attention to the dwindling population of these big cats as they are listed as endangered species.

 

We also want to give a huge shout-out to our own lion; Logie. Logie is the library’s mascot. Why a lion you may ask, well it’s all due to the Lion’s Gate Garden at Merchiston Campus. And you all named him back in 2019, a shortened version of logarithms which was invented by John Napier. He has been with us ever since, proudly promoting our libraries.

 

Photo of Logie the Lion at Merchiston Library

Photo of Logie the Lion at Merchiston Library

You can find out more about these majestic creatures by following the hashtag #WorldLionDay on Twitter,  the Big Cat Rescue or watching some documentaries on BOB (Box Of Broadcasts)!

https://learningonscreen.ac.uk/ondemand/index.php/prog/01B2B371?bcast=133938976

 

While it may seem doom and gloom, raising awareness matters and individuals can make a difference. The demand to tackle climate change and to take care of our natural environment is there. Let’s join Logie and roar for the lions.

 

By Maya Green

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