The Library Blog

Edinburgh Napier University

Manga

What is Manga?

Manga is Japanese comics, and graphics, in newspapers, magazines and books, that emerged in the 1920s. The word consists of ‘man’, ‘whimsical’ and ‘pictures. Manga demonstrates stories of characters through pictures and expressive lines. It is usually printed in black and white due to cost savings; however special editions are printed in colour.

 

 

Comic style strip of Manga

Manga comic at Merchiston Library

 

History:

Although Manga emerged during the 20th century, the earliest association was found on scrolls created by Japanese, Buddhist monks in the 12th century. They depicted chapters of animals mirroring human gestures. Printing techniques flourished in the 19th century and Manga focused on politics, although the government censored artists and even closed publishers.

Post-World War II, American occupation of Japan influenced the style, so it became more animated and entertaining for readers. These were called ‘Red Books’ and have influenced more contemporary pictures and stories today that suggest emotions and actions.

 

Manga Genres:

The Manga sub-genres consist of romance, fantasy, horror, and adventure. The most popular and modern classics are Naruto, Sailor Moon, Dragon Ball Z, Fruit Basket, and Bleach. A lot of other Manga has been satirical and can focus on darker areas like corruption and injustices.

As Manga is mainly comic books, they have also become ‘anime’ meaning animations in Japanese. Anime uses movement to explain complex stories.

 

 

Image of Bleach character Manga

Bleach

 

 

So, if you are ready to read Manga, you may find that the print copies are not your usual way of reading as traditionally it is read back to front, from the top right to the left!

 

You can find Manga resources from how to master the art of drawing Manga to Bleach via the Library Search.

We even have clips available on the Library’s Box of Broadcasts.

Please let us know if you have any recommendations for the library!

 

Other resources:

https://www.carnegielibrary.org/an-introduction-to-manga/

https://blog.britishmuseum.org/an-introduction-to-manga/

World Lion Day

World Lion Day

Today’s celebrations come to us from Big Cat Rescue. World Lion Day is celebrated to raise awareness and support for their protection and conservation. It was started in 2013 by Dereck and Beverly Joubert to celebrate these legendary animals (nationaltoday.com)

 

Lions are the second largest cat in the world, they can weigh between 300 and 550 pounds. They used to roam all over Africa and the Eurasian continent. But now it is estimated that there are only 30 000 and 100 000 lions left (daysoftheyear). World Lion Day was started in 2013 by Dereck and Beverly Joubert to bring attention to the dwindling population of these big cats as they are listed as endangered species.

 

We also want to give a huge shout-out to our own lion; Logie. Logie is the library’s mascot. Why a lion you may ask, well it’s all due to the Lion’s Gate Garden at Merchiston Campus. And you all named him back in 2019, a shortened version of logarithms which was invented by John Napier. He has been with us ever since, proudly promoting our libraries.

 

Photo of Logie the Lion at Merchiston Library

Photo of Logie the Lion at Merchiston Library

You can find out more about these majestic creatures by following the hashtag #WorldLionDay on Twitter,  the Big Cat Rescue or watching some documentaries on BOB (Box Of Broadcasts)!

https://learningonscreen.ac.uk/ondemand/index.php/prog/01B2B371?bcast=133938976

 

While it may seem doom and gloom, raising awareness matters and individuals can make a difference. The demand to tackle climate change and to take care of our natural environment is there. Let’s join Logie and roar for the lions.

 

By Maya Green

International Cat Day

International Cat Day

After the last few years of remote working and with staff working more from home now, meeting their feline companions during online meetings has been so much fun. Little furry faces and tails have often popped up mid-way through a very important discussion. Many of our staff have loved being able to spend more time with their creatures of choice and I know I love having a friendly work buddy to hang out with at home during the workday,

So that’s why to celebrate this year’s International cat day we think it would be nice to introduce you all to some of our furry friends.

Librarians and their cats

First up meet Aila. Alia is almost 17 years young and can be seen here enjoying the lovely sunshine. Aila’s human is Carol.

International cat day cat aila

Next up is Maxie. Maxie is 6ish but doesn’t think age matters. Quite right Maxie. Maxie’s hobbies include chasing birds, eating cheese and meowing very loudly all day long! Maxie’s human is Judy,

International cat day cat Maxie

Following Maxie we have Vivienne’s cats Smudge and Tigger. Smudge enjoys being petted and staring at the fridge until ham magically appears. Smudge also enjoys investigating places, especially the chimney. It’s good to be curious Smudge. Tigger is a little more timid and laid back. He enjoys pets…but only a little. Not too much mind. It’s good to hear about a cat with strong boundaries. We should all be more like Tigger.

International cat day cat Smudge International cat day Tigger

Now for two lookers, meet Lucy the British Blue at a stately 10 years young and Millie the ragdoll at a youthful 3. Both are gorgeous and both share a similar love for relaxing and comfy surfaces. Sounds like they know what they like. I have to say I too enjoy both these things. Their lucky human is Helen.

International cat day cat Lucy International cat day cat Millie

Tracey’s cat friend is the lovely Nell. Nell was rehomed when she was still a kitten and is now almost 4 years old. Both adored and spoiled she loves the outdoors and being social. She love’s to bring home pals to meet the family (and her food bowl). Who doesn’t love to host a dinner party Nell? Nice to hear about a socialising cat. Break those stereotypes Nell!

International cat day cat Nell

Now to meet Folie. Described by her human Peg as “a complete weirdo”. I’m sure Folie feels the same about her human. Her hobbies include hogging the remote and leg attacks.  It’s good to stay sharp Folie, you never know when you will be called to action. She also enjoys avoiding toddlers and maintaining a shocked expression. Folie sounds like my kind of cat.

cat Folie

This lovely kitty is Oscar. He’s our sport fanatic. Oscar loves nothing more than a bit of tennis, football or snooker. Anything with a ball keeps this kitty happy. Oscar is 13 and is the proud companion of our librarian Sarah.

Oscar the cat

Next up is my cat, Brindle. Brindle is part Siberian and a young at heart 12 years old. Brin Brin as she is known enjoys not being chased by small children and not having her tail pulled. Other hobbies include shouting at the magpies in the back garden as early in the morning as possible and snuggling with her favourite human (that’s me!).  She would also like it known that she enjoys playing fetch and will happily retrieve any items thrown her way. Sometimes, being wiser than her human she will retrieve important things at 3am as she is very goal orientated and is also aware that humans can be very forgetful and lose things. Thank you Brindle for being so thoughtful.

International cat day cat Brindle

Now we’ve saved someone very special for last. Nacho is Isabell’s special cat. Oh and I do mean special! Nacho isn’t any old cat…oh no! Nacho is a Polydactyl cat. She’s a cat with thumbs people…thumbs! Next step in evolution I say. A sure sign that cats are on their way to becoming our feline overlords. Not Nacho though. Nacho is a cutie. She is 8 years old but is a kitten at heart. she loves being cuddled like a baby over the shoulder and has a very sweet tooth.  She puts her thumbs to good use too, getting her treats out of the jar. Bravo and two thumbs up from this human for Nacho!

Nacho the cat Nacho the cat

So there you have it for International cat day. A selection of our feline companions, all of whom work tirelessly to support their hard-working humans in the Library. Want to know more about cats? Well of course you do! You can find lots of fascinating information on cats through Librarysearch.napier.co.uk

Not a fluffy animal person? We have you covered too. Check out our article on National Insect week instead.

And don’t worry all you “I’m more of a dog person” types. We will be back soon with some of our dog companions later in the month for International dog day!

A day in the life of a Library Assistant

A day in the life of a Library Assistant

Have you ever wondered what else Library Assistants do when they aren’t at the desk?

Starting our Day

Our day begins with emptying the book return bins as we check all returns to see if they have been requested or belong to another campus. If they belong to another campus or are requested at another campus, they will be put into our library crates for the porters to pick up and deliver.

We will check the library for any repairs and take any lost property to security.

The MFDs must be checked to see if the paper needs filled or if there are any issues that need to be resolved, for example, paper jams.

Using ALMA, our library management system, we compile a list of requested books and process them for the Click and Collect shelf. Any requests for postal loan users are parcelled up and put in the post.

 

 

Picture of books on a library shelf

Picture of books on a library shelf

 

We also use ALMA to generate other lists such as the missing list.

We can check our bookshelves to see if any of the missing items are there.

Our lapsafes are checked daily to make sure all laptops and chargers have been correctly returned.

During the day

We scan the bookshelves with our hand-held scanners to check for missing and mis-shelved items. We process new books and journals as they arrive and put them out on the shelves.

There is a procedure for all our tasks, and these are updated as necessary and receive an annual check.

We arrange displays and put up decorations and posters for campaigns and events such as Pride, Love your Library, and Book Week.

We write articles for the Library Blog, update the library’s digital signage, and post items on Twitter and Instagram.

 

Image of laptop with hands typing, a cup of coffee to one side and paper and pens to the other.

Creative planning at work

A day in the life of a Library Assistant: Training

There are all sorts of training courses that we attend throughout the year such as GDPR, Mental Health Awareness, and Fire Safety.

Should extraordinary events such as Covid-19 arise we respond by taking appropriate steps to fulfill University or Library guidelines.

For example, during the Covid-19 pandemic, we had to place social distancing stickers on the study desks, put seat covers on unavailable seats, block off bookshelves and make sure hand sanitisers were available for use throughout the library.

A day in the life of a Library Assistant: Summer

During the summer we will be involved in larger projects such as weeding and stock moves, but we are also on hand to help at the helpdesk and answer your phone and e-mail enquiries.

When term begins again we will be available to help with all your queries such as connecting to Eduroam, issuing books from the self-service kiosks, using the lapsafe, how to operate the MFDs, booking a group study room and so much more!

Read More about our Library here.

By Vivienne Hamilton

The history of Sighthill Campus

A lot has changed since John Napier was born in the tower at Merchiston Castle in 1550, during turbulent times for Scotland.

Times are still a little turbulent… but what would Napier think of our modern-day university campuses?

As you may know, Edinburgh Napier has 3 campus locations – at Merchiston, Craiglockhart and Sighthill. Not long after being renamed Edinburgh Napier university in 2009 (previously Napier University), the University opened its brand new £60m Sighthill campus in 2011.

 

 

Sighthill campus

Sighthill Campus, photograph from Edinburgh Napier Image Bank

 

Situated in the west of Edinburgh, sights of Sighthill include Burton’s biscuit company, Edinburgh Beer Factory, Edinburgh College  and of course our own Edinburgh Napier Sighthill Campus.

More than 5000 students choose to study at Sighthill campus, which houses the School of Health and Social Care (SHSC) and the School of Applied Sciences (SAS).

Applied sciences courses include Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Marine Biology and Conservation, as well as Sport Sciences, Social Sciences, Psychology, Policing and Careers Guidance. Facilities include Sport and exercise science labs, biotech labs and an environmental chamber to simulate high altitude conditions!

Health and Social care courses include Nursing, Midwifery, Allied Health professions and Social Work, as well as Health & Social Care Sciences. Step inside and you’ll find a 1000 sq metre Clinical skills centre with hospital wards, where students can treat ‘patients’ in a life-like setting.

https://www.napier.ac.uk/about-us/our-location/our-campuses/sighthill

 

 

image of nurse and training dummy

Nursing, photograph from Edinburgh Napier Image Bank

 

The opening of the 2011 Sighthill campus, with its brand new 5 storey Learning Resource Centre library, meant the bringing together of staff from a number of small ‘school of health’ libraries at Livingston St John’s hospital, Canaan Lane campus which was on the grounds of the Astley Ainslie Hospital and Comely Bank campus which was situated within the Western General Hospital’s grounds.

However, Edinburgh Napier was present at Sighthill long before 2011!

Sighthill Campus was originally opened in 1968 as custom-built accommodation for Edinburgh College of Commerce. The Edinburgh Corporation established the college in 1966 and subjects taught here would have included management and business studies – which you will now find at Craiglockhart campus!

In 1974, Edinburgh College of Commerce was amalgamated with Napier College of Science & Technology – and Napier College of Commerce & Technology was born. In 1986, Napier College became Napier Polytechnic, and then Napier University in 1992.

 

Notably, in 1984, her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and HRH Duke of Edinburgh came to Sighthill campus to open the newly refurbished library! The library was given the apt name of ‘The Queens Library’.

 

 

Image of her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to open Sighthill Library

Queen Elizabeth II opened Sighthill Library

 

 

Our present-day Sighthill LRC has a range of study environments fit for any royalty 👑 👑 👑!.

Across 5 floors, we have around 300 networked computers, spaces for laptops, study booths and collaborative desks for group work.

Our book collections are spread across the 3rd and 4th floors, with group study rooms, silent study areas and a relaxation space also available.

You can also borrow laptops from our LapSafe or ask for help at our Help Desk on LRC2.

Want to know more? Find out here.

 

Sources:

https://www.napier.ac.uk/about-us/our-history

https://www.napier.ac.uk/about-us/our-location/our-campuses/sighthill

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edinburgh_Napier_University

https://my.napier.ac.uk/library/about-the-library/sighthill

Seath, G. (2017). Beyond Logarithms & Bones: A short history of John Napier and his legacy.

The Napier Estate: past and present. (2007). Napier University.

 

By Judy Wheeler

Edinburgh’s First Commonwealth Games

Edinburgh’s First Commonwealth Games

The 22nd Commonwealth Games begin in Birmingham this month and are expected to be the largest yet staged.

Edinburgh has played host to the games twice. The first of these in 1970, the 9th British Commonwealth Games, was the first major multi-sport event ever staged in Scotland.

The Commonwealth Games Newsletters: A Fantastic Insight

The Library through the JSTOR database has access to an archive of the official newsletters published in the lead-up to those games.

These give a fascinating insight into the organisational efforts required to stage the games, reflect the excitement the games generated, and highlight some of the societal and technological changes we have witnessed since.

In addition to the nearly £4 million capital sum spent on creating the major venues, a general appeal was launched to fund the games with an initial target of £200,000.  The newsletters tell us that contributions received ranged from a single 3d (1.5p) stamp from an anonymous donor to £25000 from both Edinburgh and Glasgow Corporations. Dinner dances, whist drives, and fashion shows are all reported as helping to swell the coffers as the games approached.

For a celebration of athleticism, a donation of £1000 from a cigarette manufacturer may raise eyebrows today but was received without qualms at that time.

Donations in kind were also received. One fuel company offered to provide 10000 gallons of petrol for the official vehicles. How much would that be worth at today’s prices?

The vehicles were supplied by solid British manufacturers including Leyland and Rootes and volunteer drivers were recruited. Specific mention is made of the 20 “lady drivers” provided by the Edinburgh Junior Chambers of Commerce Wives Group.

Tickets could be purchased by post, or in person at the official ticket outlet, R W Forsyth’s, one of Princes Street’s leading stores.

In true Scottish fashion, the January newsletter tells us, “Telephone bookings cannot be entertained, as orders must be accompanied by the appropriate costs before tickets can be released”.

So, Nae cash! Nae ticket!

Edinburgh’s First Commonwealth Games

A day at the bowls arena cost 7/- 6d (38p) but a hefty £4 was required for prime seating at the closing ceremony, though there was an unreserved open-air seating option at 15/- (75p). Comparable seats at Birmingham are priced at £290

Edinburgh’s first Commonwealth Games Pin Badge

Teams were housed in a “Games village” at Edinburgh University’s Pollok Halls. It was reported that the catering subcommittee was “evolving Eastern and Western menus”, and one-third of the dishes were “non-British in origin”. However, haggis, porridge, and Scotch broth would be available as “novelties’’.

A very precise 42/- 3d (£2.11) per day was allocated to feed the competitors but no one would be “refused seconds”. It was also noted that washing and toilet facilities would be available on every floor of the accommodation!

Modernism was creeping in. The games were the first to be measured in metric, so 400 metres replaced 440 yards etc. They were also the first with electronic timing and backstage at the weightlifting a “unique scoreboard with writing in light” was specifically mentioned. CCTV was also introduced so that competitors did not have to join the audience to watch their rivals in action.

Whilst upward of a “million paper photocopies” were to be provided for the press there was heavy emphasis placed on modern telecommunications. 500 extra private telephone/telex circuits were being installed, along with 200 new public telephones, including 12 in a bus for use on the cycle road race. Unfortunately, the mechanics of this latter operation are not elaborated on, but the concept of the mobile phone would appear to be not that new.

Events would also be broadcast on TV in colour, though the latter had only arrived in Scotland the previous December and was not yet that widespread.

Whilst today we take for granted many aspects involved in organising major sporting events, these newsletters reflect the remarkable nature of many of the preparations back then.

At an estimated £778 million it would certainly require many successful whilst drives to help assuage the costs of the 2022 games.

I wonder however if that same palpable sense of excitement at the ‘new’ evident from these newsletters can be duplicated in Birmingham.

Further reading

IXth British Commonwealth Games Newsletters

Sport in History Article

Remembering “The Forgotten Games”: A Reinterpretation of the 1954 British Empire and Commonwealth Games

Boycotts and Bailouts

By John Baillie

Read more History on our blog:

Check out this article by John on Bonfire Night

Postgraduate study

So, you’ve finished your undergraduate degree, passed your exams and graduated. Phew!

We give you our warmest congratulations and hope you’re now enjoying a well-earned rest. But as your thoughts turn to the future, can we interest you in some further study? Have you considered doing a postgraduate degree?

 

As a post-graduate, your employability is greatly boosted. In fact, according to the UK Commission for Employment and Skills, around 1 in 7 jobs now require a post-graduate degree. And following on from that is the fact that the job you get afterwards will probably be better paid. In 2018, the median postgraduate salary was £6,000 higher (£40,000) than the median graduate salary (£34,000).

Here at Edinburgh Napier, we have a wealth of help and resources to help you in your post-graduate research. See here for more details at Postgraduate Research (napier.ac.uk)

 

 

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

 

As an Edinburgh Napier graduate, you’ll be eligible for 20% off your Masters fees. Our programmes are created in collaboration with industry and employers, and 96.2% of our post-graduate students are in work or education six months after graduation. We have a range of study options for our PGs – including online and distance learning programmes.

 

You can browse our courses here

We’re hosting a postgraduate virtual open day later in the year. Register below to get access to the platform for 30 days after the event.

We look forward to welcoming you back soon!

 

By Lesley McRobb

World Emoji Day: Sunday the 17th of July 2022

Today is World Emoji Day! 😋😍🤣

 

But what exactly is an emoji and where did they come from?

 

Emojis are popular icons that demonstrate how we feel, our emotions, moods and expressions. For example, a smiley face represents that we are happy 😊. They are used to communicate in texts on our phones 📱, emails 📧 on our laptops or tablets 💻, and even on professional channels like Microsoft Teams! Most of the emojis are animated to exaggerate the sender’s emotions.

 

It originally derives from the Japanese word, ‘kanji’ meaning picture. The great thing about emojis is that no words are needed to describe how you feel- it is all pictorial!

In 1999 Japanese artist Shigetaka Kurita created the first 176 emoji while working for mobile internet service. You can see this work at the New York’s Museum of Modern Art

 

 

Exhibition of Emojis

Exhibition of Emojis https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/emoji-shigetaka-kurita-standards-manual/index.html

 

 

In 2007 Google was the first to incorporate them into Gmail (email service). But it was not until 2010 that the emojis were released on both an iPhone and Android, and now each emoji has an unlimited resolution.

Emojis create a culture of inclusivity that helps some neurodiverse users to communicate more easily when online. They can use pictorial emojis as a communication method that helps their sensory processing. Emojis produce visibility and give users voices, through the power of pictorial expression, representation, and storytelling. Apple has even proposed new emojis that represent people with hearing aids and prosthetic limbs.

 

https://worldemojiday.com/ 

 

Emojis can even be used to show phrases not just expressions or emotions.

So, can you guess the title of these books through emojis? You can also find these on our Library Search.

 

1. 🕰️🍑 (Clue: Time is ticking for this book and film adaptation)

 

2. 🧛‍♀️ (Clue: This 1897 gothic novel is something to sink your teeth into…)

 

3.  👩🐉💉(Clue: Look behind you for this mythical, fire-breathing reptile)

 

4. 🐦🎵 (Clue: It may have wings and like to chirp, but this novel brings more awareness to the experience of war).

 

 

Leave your answers below, alongside your favourite emoji! 😁

 

By Jemma Lidgard

What the Librarians are Reading: Books we recommend!

What the librarians are reading: Books we recommend! Part 2

Stumped for your next read? Curious what the book professionals are reading? Look no further!  Here’s a peek into what the staff here at Edinburgh Napier University Library (ENULibrary) have been reading over the last year.

Check out recommended books from all genres and Interests (we are a diverse lot!) Some are available right here at the Library. For the books we don’t have, why not try your local library? Edinburgh City Libraries have a huge selection of books and we love supporting them.

The Book Reviews


Marian

Book Cover A tale for the time beingA tale for the time beingby Ruth Ozeki

Intricately interwoven plots, fascinating settings in British Columbia and Japan, full of ideas, touching and thought-provoking, shortlisted for the 2013 Man Booker Prize. 

 

Book Cover Loud and Close

 

Extremely loud & incredibly close by Jonathan Safran Foer

“This deals with difficult themes but is full of humour and zaniness, and very well-written.

 

Book Cover Thursday Murder club

 

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman

“A quick entertaining read certainly.

 

 

You can borrow A tale for the time being”  and “Extremely loud & incredibly close” from our Library today!

Lesley

Book Cover Vicious“Vicious by V.E. Schwab

“If you could choose a superpower, what would it be?  Invisibility? Immortality?  You might want to reconsider your options after reading Vicious, a smart, witty take on the superpower/superhero genre. This is a grown-up page-turner with plot twists and snappy dialogue throughout, and it’s all shot through with deliciously macabre humour. V.E. Schwab is an American author who lives in Edinburgh.  We’re lucky to have her.  

You can borrow this one from us! Check out LibrarySearch

Cathryn

Book cover fair BotanistsThe Fair Botanists”  By Sara Sheridan

Set in 1822 Enlightenment Edinburgh at the time of the impending visit by King George 1V to the city and the move of the Botanical Garden from Leith Walk to where it is now at Inverleith.  Sir Walter Scott who was responsible for organising the King’s visit features as does the rare flowering of the Agave Americana in one of the Botanics glasshouses.  The story follows the twists and turns of the lives of the 2 main female characters Elizabeth Rocheid who arrived in the city after the death of her husband and the enigmatic Belle Brodie.  I enjoyed this book as it was based in Edinburgh and I recognised all the places it mentioned, the historical and botanical  references were also really interesting .”

 

Book Cover Starlit Seas“On Starlit Seas” By Sara Sheridan

Historical novel set in Georgian times, based around the true character, recently widowed author Maria Graham.  She’s been used to travelling around South America with her husband but now she must make to the journey back to England to visit her publisher.  She books a place on a ship bound for Bristol captained by Captain James Henderson a roguish smuggler.  For those who love chocolate, the story is woven around the consumption of chocolate and the Fry family of Bristol are characters in the novel!   

 

Why not check out our previous installment ofWhat the Librarians are reading books we recommend.

 

Main photo by Christin Hume on Unsplash

World Chocolate Day Thursday 7th of July 2022

Take a moment to indulge in World Chocolate Day!  

Did you know that approximately 1 billion people from around the world eat chocolates every day?  

This just shows that many of us cannot resist the temptation of chocolaty treats. Chocolate is also the food of love! It may be recognised as unhealthy, but dark chocolate has many health benefits to creating a calm and happy mood, improving memory and even helps to keep that heart healthy… but remember everything is in moderation! 

 

What is the story of chocolate? 

Chocolate begins from the pods of the cacao tree and is native to Central and South America. Each pod is usually grown from the trunk and in the larger branches, which contain the cacao beans.  

Did you know cacao is the botanical name for the unfermented beans and cocoa is the manufactured product?  You can find more about the cocoa bean via our Library Search here: 

https://napier.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/44NAP_INST/n96pef/alma99525930102111  

 

 

Image of Cacao

Cacao

Photo by Tetiana Bykovets on Unsplash.

 

 

Chocolate is traced back to Mayans where it was consumed in liquid form for celebrations and complimented with most meals. It was often combined with chillies, water and honey. The Aztecs also believed that chocolate was sacred and used the cacao beans as currency- more valuable than gold!  

During the industrial revolution, chocolate was booming. Half of the cacao butter was removed for the chocolate liquor and resulting in a creamier and improved quality. It was the modern era for cost-effective, machine-based chocolate. 

John Cadbury opened the first shop in Birmingham in 1824 and has manufactured chocolate since. Due to the machinery, different types of chocolate have emerged and today it is a highly refined, edible confectionary.   

https://www.cadbury.co.uk/our-story  

 

Image of Cadbury Bournville Chocolate

Cadbury Bournville Chocolate

Photo by Shri on Unsplash.

 

 

Fair-trade chocolate  

Fairtrade Chocolate supports changing the way cocoa is supplied, ethical working conditions and sustainable incomes for farmers and their families. You can recognise the fairtrade on products like this one below: 

Find more about Fair Trade here: https://www.fairtrade.org.uk/Buying-Fairtrade/Chocolate/ 

 

 

Cadbury-inspired recipe spies in Roald Dahl’s novel Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. You can find Tim Burton’s adaptation of this DVD via the library search:  

https://napier.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/44NAP_INST/n96pef/alma9920610750102111  

 

 

Let us know which is your favourite chocolate bar in the comments below?  

 

Find more information  

https://nationaltoday.com/world-chocolate-day/  

https://www.history.com/topics/ancient-americas/history-of-chocolate  

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