Edinburgh Napier University

Category: Celebration Week (Page 1 of 2)

Scottish Women in Science

Scottish Women in Science  

Scotland has a rich history of scientific achievements and Scottish women have played a pivotal role in shaping these accomplishments. From groundbreaking discoveries to innovative research, these remarkable women have defied societal norms and overcome countless obstacles to leave an indelible mark on the field of science.

Historical Scottish Women Pioneers in Science

Even in times when opportunities for women were severely limited, Scottish women managed to push the boundaries and excel in various scientific disciplines. One such pioneer was Mary Somerville, who became a renowned mathematician and astronomer in the 19th century. Her work in celestial mechanics and her influential book “The Mechanism of the Heavens” significantly contributed to our understanding of the universe.

Another trailblazer was Elizabeth Blackwell, who became the first woman to graduate from medical school in the United States in 1849. Born in Aberdeen, Scotland, Blackwell faced immense challenges and discrimination in her pursuit of a medical career. Her determination and resilience not only opened doors for women in medicine but also paved the way for future generations of female physicians.

In the field of medicine, Dr. Elsie Inglis revolutionized healthcare by establishing the Scottish Women’s Hospitals during World War I. Her tireless efforts saved countless lives and challenged the prevailing gender norms of the time.

Modern Scottish Women Making Strides in the Scientific World

Professor Linda Bauld is a public health expert, Bauld has been instrumental in shaping Scotland’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Her research on public health behaviour and interventions has had a significant impact on policy both in Scotland and internationally.

In the realm of environmental science, Professor Sheila Rowan has made groundbreaking discoveries in gravitational wave detection. Her research has opened up new possibilities for studying the universe, earning her international acclaim and recognition.

The primatologist and neuroethologist Professor Dame Anne Glover is a world-leading expert on animal behaviour and cognition. She has served as Chief Scientific Adviser to the UK Government and has received many honours and awards.

Scientists of Edinburgh Napier University

Edinburgh Napier University is home to many talented women scientists who are making significant contributions in various fields.

  • Prof Yvonne Kuipers, Professor of Midwifery, has over 20 years of experience in women’s reproductive health. She has conducted research on a variety of topics, including home birth, traumatic childbirth experiences, and midwifery-led care.
  • Dr. Fiona Lees, Professor of Occupational Therapy, is an expert in disability studies. She has conducted research on a variety of topics, including wheelchair use, falls prevention, and social care.
  • Prof Emma Hart is a professor of computational intelligence here at Edinburgh Napier. She is known for her work in artificial immune systems (AIS)evolutionary computation and optimisation.
  • Dr. Clare Taylor is a Senior Lecturer in Medical Microbiology and is a passionate advocate of equality and inclusion

These are just a few examples of the many accomplished women scientists working at Edinburgh Napier University. Their research is making a real difference in the world, and they are inspiring the next generation of female scientists. In addition to these individual researchers, Edinburgh Napier University is committed to supporting women in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) more broadly.

The university has several initiatives in place to encourage girls and young women to pursue careers in science. Such as the EQUATE Scotland program, which provides mentoring and support to women in the built environment, engineering, technology, and science sectors.

Celebrating the Achievements of Scottish Women in Science

Scottish women have played a vital role in shaping the scientific world. Defying societal expectations and making groundbreaking discoveries. From the pioneers of the past to the trailblazers of today, their contributions have paved the way for future generations of scientists. It is crucial to celebrate and recognize their achievements, while also working towards creating a more inclusive and equitable scientific community. By supporting and empowering Scottish women in science, we can ensure that their remarkable legacy continues to inspire and drive scientific progress for years to come.

Join us in celebrating the achievements of Scottish women in science by sharing their stories and advocating for gender equality in STEM fields. Together, we can break down barriers and create a more inclusive scientific community.

By Juliet Kinsey

Read more on Women in Science here.

 

The 12 Days of Festive Library Resources: Part One

The 12 Days of Festive Library Resources

Part one

To celebrate the end of the year and the beginning of the Festive holiday break we thought we’d share some of our best resources.

Below is a list of some of our best:

Day One: Librarysearch

We have to start with our trusty Library Catalogue, LibrarySearch. Found at Librarysearch.napier.ac.uk.

This is a great place to start. Remember to sign in first before you start your search.

You will find information on everything the library has available and information on how to access it. Read our guide on how to get started with LibrarySearch.

Day Two: Box of Broadcasts

On the second day of Christmas, my library gave me

BoB (Box of Broadcasts) is an innovative shared online off-air TV and radio recording service for UK higher and further education institutions. It contains over a million items including an archive of all BBC TV and radio content dating from 2007.
BoB enables all staff and students in subscribing institutions to choose and record any scheduled broadcast programme from 60+ TV and radio channels. You can also edit programs into clips, create playlists, embed clips into Moodle, share items via social media and generate reference citations.

Please note that our BoB licence is for educational purposes only, and only for use within the UK.

Box of Broadcasts is a truly fantastic database.

Visit learning on screen and use your university login to start watching.

Day Three: LibKey Nomad

This amazing tool will help you get full-text access to books and articles! You can add it as a browser extension or go to their website. It’s so good it even works on Amazon! It will tell you all the possible sources for the literature you are looking for and where to get them. Check out our Libkey guide here and watch the video below.

Day 4: Wellness

Here in the Library, we believe that looking after your physical and emotional health is just as important as your studies. So we created the Wellbeing Collection. University life can be challenging, even at the best of times. We’ve gathered together these resources in the hope that they help you feel happy, healthy and comfortable at Edinburgh Napier. Our collection covers a range of topics and includes guided self-help approaches to supporting mental health, personal development and achievement. You’ll find stories of resilience and recovery, discussions of family matters, and practical tools to help with the everyday realities of University life, such as finance and exam stress. If you have any suggestions, you can email library@napier.ac.uk

Day 5: DigiMap

Digimap is an online map and data delivery service. Digimap offers a number of data collections, including Ordnance Survey, historical, geological, LiDAR and marine maps and spatial data. You can create or interrogate a map online by selecting an appropriate base map, adding annotations and customising the content, use measurement and query tools to learn more about any study area. Download the raw spatial data in a wide range of formats for use in local GIS, CAD or image processing software.

Read more about Digimap in our blog post “Introducing DigiMap

Check out their DigiMap help guides on YouTube

Day 6: Databases

We provide 190 databases covering every imaginable subject, from engineering to art. We have you covered. You can find them all on LibrarySearch . If you need a bit of help on how to navigate, we have subject-specific Libguides to help you get a more tailored research experience.

Check in with the Blog next week for Part Two!

By Juliet Kinsey and Maya Green

An Oyster full of Opportunities: National Career Development Month

An Oyster full of Opportunities: National Career Development Month

 

With the end of November coming, and with that, the end of National Career Development Month: an oyster full of opportunities. Today, we are going to reflect, looking at what Napier can do for you.

Background and Information…

Spanning from the 1st of November to the 30th of November, National Career Development Month returns  to promote the significance of career progression and planning. This is a month-long campaign by the National Career Development Association. All since 1967.  Introduced with the primary objective of encouraging an increase in comprehensive career services and assistance. And providing a platform for organisations, educational institutions and careers advisors to actively assist individuals with their career journeys through the provision of effective support, guidance and resources. To support whether seeking a career change, trying to reach professional goals and excel in their current role, or require assistance with progressing into a specific career pathway.

What is a career?

The simple and widely recognised definition of a career is the occupation and position of employment which an individual holds. And usually, one which involves specific training and specialised learning. It is also an over-arching definition for a lifetime of learning and progression in an individual’s ‘journey’. With personal development, extensive training and acquiring new skills along the way.

Our Student Futures Team…

Student Futures is our dedicated team of career professionals who can help with anything career. From CV writing to interview support. And more information about them and their resources can be found here.

 

Conclusion…

Remember at some point in our childhoods being asked what we wanted to be when we grew up?  In relation to which career we wanted to pursue in the future.  And some people are still figuring out their career. If you find yourself relating to this, there is a vast range of support and resources out there.  Available on Library Search.

Thinking about Postgraduate study,  we have a blog post

by Rachel Downie

Photo source Javier Allegue Barros

International Games Month is back

International Games Month is back!

It’s that time of year again when, between Halloween and the anticipation of Christmas, libraries all over the world celebrate International Games Month!

This initiative, which arrived in the UK from the other side of the Atlantic, more than ten years ago, has been celebrated among public, academic, health, school, and specialist libraries.

Today libraries are using games to engage, entertain and educate their users across sectors. So we didn’t want to miss the opportunity to promote games, play, libraries and learning altogether.

To do that, we have brought back some of the most popular initiatives to engage you. Furthermore, there is a chance to win some Amazon vouchers, whether you want to participate on a paper version or are a distance learner.

You’ll find links to all our activities (and Terms & Conditions for the games) here: https://libcal.napier.ac.uk/

Win an Amazon voucher! 

As in previous years, we’re giving students multiple opportunities to win an Amazon voucher!

Play online, send your completed puzzle/quiz from your university email address to library@napier.ac.uk with the subject line ‘International Games Month’. Correct entries will be entered into the draw to win a voucher.

Complete the Logie the Lion Jigsaw  

Library Words Word Search 

Again, we encourage you to give a go to the 2023 edition of our Plot Keywords Quiz! Use the keywords provided to work out the title of the book which has been made into a film!  Click on the link https://libcal.napier.ac.uk/ to access the quiz sheet.

Paper copies of the Word Search and our Plot Keywords Quiz are available at each campus library if you prefer to hand in a paper copy.

Additional Games for you to play for fun! 

A great way to brain-train yourself and get a break after studying and focusing on assignments is to take your mind off the books and enjoy our additional games to play. You will find them with the rest of the resources.

Reading List

And finally, if you want to find more useful resources on the importance of gaming, video games and effective fun learning, please check our updated Reading List.

Feedback 

We’d love to have your feedback on our International Games Month events.  Complete the feedback form with short questions to help us out!

By Emi Pastor

National Tree Week

National Tree Week

This year National Tree Week . It runs from 25th November until 3rd December and marks the start of the tree planting season. It’s a chance for us to celebrate our trees and, if you can, volunteer to take part in tree-planting activities. These are organized by volunteer groups and conservation bodies. If you can’t manage to do this, you may be able to find a little Tree Time to connect with trees.

Trees are an important part of ecosystems across the planet and provide food, homes and shelter for many species and help stabilize eroding riverbanks. Also, as climate change is an issue of global concern, trees can help mitigate it. By storing carbon in tree tissue and sequestering atmospheric carbon from the key greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide releases oxygen.

Background

Most of Scotland’s native tree and shrub species colonised the landscape after the last Ice Age (which ended roughly 9,000 years ago). Their seeds are dispersed by wind, water, and animals. Scotland’s native Caledonian pine forests used to cover the entire country. The landscape was dominated by ancient oaks and Scots pines, which have all but disappeared. Several events have contributed to the decline in tree numbers over millennia.

Over 4000 years ago the climate changed to become cooler and wetter. Trees were then unable to grow on higher ground. Around the same time, woodlands began to be cleared for agriculture. This has continued for centuries with even more being cleared to accommodate housing and infrastructure such as electricity pylons.

Early in the 20th century many trees were lost as part of the World War 1 war effort. Following the war and with the passing of the Forestry Act in September 1919, the Forestry Commission was founded to restore the nation’s woods and forests. The Commission bought large amounts of agricultural land on behalf of the state, eventually becoming the largest manager of land in Britain. At the time large pine plantations were established, but as time passed it became apparent that these densely planted, single-species plantations were not providing the range of tree species required to provide diverse wildlife habitats. The emphasis is now on a much wider range of species such as broadleaved and open ground specialist species.

In recent years Scotland has been battered by some severe winter storms. In particular Storm Arwen in November 2021. It is estimated about 16 million trees in Scotland were affected. Damage and loss were particularly significant in the north east and south of the country.

Furthermore, diseases such as Dutch Elm disease have wiped out many of Scotland’s trees.

The Future

Following devolution the Scottish government became responsible for forestry and set up Scottish Forestry  with its own strategies and long-term plans. The website has lots of information about our native woodlands and much more!

Here in Scotland many volunteers, conservation groups and private estates are re-planting trees. So as to try to increase tree coverage and biodiversity through the benefits trees provide. Project Laxford is taking place on the Reay Forest Estate in Sutherland. One of the aims of the project is to boost North Atlantic salmon numbers in the River Laxford. Estate workers had noticed a massive decline in numbers and one of the measures suggested by scientists was to re-generate tree coverage which had been lost along riverbanks. Salmon are sensitive to rises in water temperature which may be caused by climate change. It is hoped that tree leaves will provide shade to help the salmon, invertebrates will fall into the river from the trees. This increases food stock and dead trees and branches which fall into the river will provide a habitat for spawning and feeding. In all, one million trees are to be planted across the estate to enhance biodiversity and improve the habitat of the river and surrounding landscape.

Famous trees

Sycamore Gap Tree

It’s not often that a tree makes headline news, but the recent felling of the Sycamore Gap tree at Hadrian’s Wall did just that. Estimated to be around 150 years old the tree has been featured in TV and film productions (Robin Hood- Prince of Thieves and Vera). It was a popular photographic subject and had won England Tree of the Year in 2016. Investigations into the unauthorised felling are ongoing and there has been much anger and sadness following the event. Many people had come to the tree for special events such as milestone birthdays, marriage proposals, and to scatter loved ones’ ashes. It held great sentimental value to them. The tree has now been removed with police investigations carrying on.

The Glen Affric Elm-The Last Ent of Affric

This solitary tree is the only one of its kind in Glen Affric. Sometimes called the Last Ent after the tree creatures in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. It is thought that the tree’s remoteness has prevented it from being affected by the spread of Dutch Elm disease which has wiped out many of Scotland’s elms. It’s not known how old the tree is, but it is thought to be the last remnant of an ancient forest and was a worthy winner of Scotland’s tree of the year 2019.

The Fortingall Yew

Thought to be around 5,000 years old this ancient yew stands in the grounds of the churchyard of Fortingall in Perthshire and draws in many tourists to the area. Yew trees are either male or female and the Fortingall Yew is male. The trunk is showing signs of damage which may have been caused by ancient rights being performed around it. It was used in funerals until the 20th century when there was a practice of passing the dead body beneath its arching branches. This passing of the body beneath the arch was a way of guiding the righteous spirit into the Christian afterlife. The yew tree, although poisonous, is also associated with life and resurrection, probably because the branches can take root and regrow as trunks, like a resurrection. The pagan festival of Beltane, held on May 1 used the grounds around the Fortingall Yew as a setting for fertility bonfires. If couples wished to conceive a child, they would leap over the flames of the bonfires hand-in-hand. If they did so successfully, the legend said they would have a child. The fires took their toll on the tree causing considerable damage over the years. Further damage was caused by people taking cuttings from branches for luck. Walls were constructed to try to protect the yew, but in recent years it seems that it is suffering from stress as a branch appears to have become female after sprouting red berries in the autumn of 2015.

This demonstrates how we can have an adverse effect on our trees and makes the work being done by conservationists and volunteers even more important.

Find out more

You can find books and articles about trees and conservation using Library Search.

By Vivienne Hamilton

Image Source: Photo by Arnaud Mesureur on Unsplash

Movember: Supporting Men’s Health

Movember: Supporting Men’s Health

Calling all our Mo Bros! It’s that time of year again. We want you to embrace your facial hair and grow a moustache for a month. Movember is the global phenomenon that has put men’s health firmly on the agenda and hair firmly on their faces.

History

It’s a movement that started 20 years ago in Australia when two mates met up for a beer and joked about reviving the out-of-fashion moustache. Why not combine their challenge with raising money for charity, they asked themselves. And why not make it a men’s health charity? After all, men are notoriously reticent in talking about their health – mental or physical.

The movement was born, and since then campaigns across the world have been fund-raised for prostate and testicular cancer research and treatment, poor mental health and physical inactivity. Perhaps more importantly, it has created a fundamental shift in the way we talk about men’s health and asks the questions that were previously unuttered. Why, for example, do Black men have twice the risk of prostate cancer diagnosis than other men? Why are first responders (emergency service workers and military veterans) at increased risk of poor mental health and suicide? Why do men find it more difficult than women to make social connections and how have the COVID-19 lockdowns affected that?

Get Involved this Movember in Supporting Men’s Health

There are all sorts of ways you can support Movember. You can grow a moustache, of course, but you can also host a mo-ment – an event that raises awareness. You can fundraise at work or among classmates and friends. Or maybe you’d like to buy some Mo merch.

However you do it, we’re sure you’ll mo your own way.

See here for details on this year’s happenings:

Movember – Changing the face of men’s health – Movember

By Lesley McRobb

Image Source: Photo by Alan Hardman on Unsplash

Read more articles on Mental Health such as World Mental Health Day.

Libraries Week 2023

Libraries Week 2023

Libraries Week is an annual celebration held to promote the best that libraries have to offer. This year, Libraries Week becomes Green Libraries Week!

From the 2nd to the 8th of October, libraries across the UK will celebrate the work they do related to climate change and sustainability. 

Find out what’s happening in libraries throughout the UK during Green Libraries Week 2023 by following @librariesweek  

Libraries Week 2023 Resources

You can search for library resources on all sustainability and climate change topics using LibrarySearch 

If you find a book is at another campus library, you can always request it through our Click and Collect service. 

Lions Gate Garden

Lions gate Garden

Adjacent to the Library at Merchiston campus is the Lion’s Gate Garden. You can see the garden from the relaxation area in the Library.  

The Lion’s Gate Garden is an interdisciplinary, permaculture learning and demonstration site. Functioning as a garden, outdoor sustainability laboratory, allotment, venue, performance, re-wilding, and relaxation space. Furthermore, It is designed to protect and enhance the biodiversity of Edinburgh Napier University campuses as per the University’s Environmental Sustainability Strategy 

Find out more about the Lion’s Gate and the other green initiatives across the other campuses including the orchard at Craiglockhart and how you can become involved on the Lion’s Gate Blog. 

By Sarah Jeffcott

Read more on nature with these posts:

Wild Animals of Scotland

International Day of Zero Waste

 

Unleashing the Power of Left-Handedness: Exploring the Advantages of Being Left-Handed

Unleashing the Power of Left-Handedness: Exploring the Advantages of Being Left-Handed

Left-handedness, a natural phenomenon that has intrigued scientists and societies for centuries, refers to the preference of using the left hand over the right hand for various activities. Approximately 10% of the global population is left-handed, making it a relatively rare trait. While left-handedness is often seen as a unique and intriguing characteristic, it has also been associated with certain advantages and disadvantages. In this article, we will delve into the advantages of being left-handed, explore its presence in different cultures, examine famous left-handed individuals, discuss its impact on sports, address the challenges and misconceptions surrounding left-handedness, explore the concept of ambidextrousness, and highlight specialized products and tools for left-handed individuals.

The advantages of being left-handed

Being left-handed can provide individuals with various advantages. One significant advantage is enhanced creativity. Studies have shown that left-handed individuals tend to have a more developed right brain hemisphere, which is associated with creativity and artistic abilities. This may explain why a significant number of artists, musicians, and writers are left-handed. Additionally, left-handed individuals often possess increased problem-solving skills and are adept at thinking outside the box, which can be advantageous in many professional fields.

Another advantage of being left-handed is improved spatial reasoning. Left-handed individuals typically have a more developed right parietal cortex, which is responsible for spatial awareness and visualization. This enhanced spatial reasoning can be beneficial in activities such as architecture, engineering, and sports that require precise coordination and understanding of spatial relationships.

Left-handedness has also been linked to better multitasking abilities. Research suggests that left-handed individuals have a higher degree of interhemispheric connectivity, allowing for more efficient communication between the brain’s two hemispheres. This enhanced connectivity enables left-handed individuals to excel in tasks that require simultaneous processing of multiple sources of information, such as driving while talking on the phone or multitasking in a fast-paced work environment.

Left-handedness in different cultures

Throughout history, left-handedness has been viewed differently across various cultures. In some cultures, being left-handed was considered taboo or associated with negative connotations, leading to discrimination and attempts to convert left-handed individuals to right-handedness. However, in other cultures, left-handedness was celebrated and considered a sign of uniqueness and special abilities.

For example, ancient Egyptians believed that left-handedness was a divine characteristic, associating it with the goddess Isis. In certain African cultures, left-handed individuals were believed to possess spiritual powers and were revered as healers or shamans. In contrast, many Western societies historically viewed left-handedness as a sign of evil or witchcraft, leading to societal pressure to convert left-handed individuals to right-handedness.

Fortunately, the perception of left-handedness has evolved over time, with greater acceptance and recognition of its natural occurrence. Today, many cultures celebrate left-handedness and highlight the advantages and unique qualities associated with being left-handed.

Famous left-handed individuals

Left-handedness has been prevalent among numerous famous individuals throughout history. From artists and athletes to politicians and scientists, left-handedness has not hindered the success of these individuals but has often contributed to their achievements. Some notable left-handed actors include Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Cruise, and Julia Roberts, who have captivated audiences with their exceptional acting skills and charisma.

In the realm of music, left-handed musicians such as Jimi Hendrix, Paul McCartney, and Kurt Cobain have left an indelible mark on the world of music with their innovative styles and groundbreaking compositions. Their left-handedness brought a unique perspective to their craft, contributing to their iconic status in the music industry.

From a scientific standpoint, left-handed individuals such as Albert Einstein and Marie Curie have made significant contributions to their respective fields, showcasing that left-handedness is not a hindrance but rather a characteristic that can coexist with exceptional intelligence and groundbreaking discoveries.

These examples serve as a testament to the fact that left-handedness is not a limitation but rather an asset that can contribute to remarkable achievements in various domains.

Left-handedness in sports

Left-handedness can provide a competitive edge in the world of sports. In many sports, left-handed athletes possess a natural advantage due to their opponents’ relative lack of experience in facing left-handed competitors. This unexpectedness can disrupt the opponent’s usual strategies and provide left-handed athletes with a higher chance of success.

For instance, in tennis, left-handed players often have an advantage over right-handed players due to the difference in spin and angle of the ball when it is struck by a left-handed player’s racket. This can create difficulties for right-handed opponents in adjusting their shots and positioning on the court.

Similarly, in combat sports such as boxing or martial arts, left-handed fighters, known as southpaws, often pose challenges for their right-handed opponents. The reversed stance and different angles of attack can catch right-handed opponents off guard and require additional adaptation and strategy.

Left-handedness can also be advantageous in team sports such as basketball or soccer. Left-handed players can provide a unique playing style and contribute to the team’s tactical diversity. Their left-handedness can create unpredictable situations for the opposing team, as they are accustomed to defending against right-handed players.

Challenges and misconceptions about left-handedness

Despite the advantages associated with being left-handed, there are also challenges and misconceptions that left-handed individuals may encounter. One common misconception is that left-handed individuals are less intelligent or more prone to certain health conditions. However, scientific research has debunked these myths, reaffirming that left-handedness is simply a natural variation in human development with no inherent disadvantages.

One challenge that left-handed individuals may face is the lack of left-handed products and tools in a right-handed dominant world. Many everyday objects, such as scissors, can openers, and desks, are designed for right-handed individuals, which can make certain tasks more challenging or uncomfortable for left-handed individuals. However, with increasing awareness and demand, there has been a growing availability of specialized products and tools designed specifically for left-handed individuals, alleviating these challenges to some extent.

Ambisinistrousness: The ability to use both hands equally well

While left-handedness is often associated with a preference for using the left hand, some individuals possess the unique ability to use both hands equally well. This phenomenon is known as ambisinistrousness. Ambisinistrous individuals are not strictly left-handed or right-handed but have a high degree of ambidexterity.

Ambisinistrousness can be advantageous in various situations. Individuals with this ability can effortlessly switch between hands, allowing them to adapt quickly to different tasks and situations. This flexibility can be particularly beneficial in activities that require fine motor skills or coordinated movements.

Ambisinistrous individuals often excel in musical instruments that require both hands, such as piano or guitar, as they can seamlessly navigate the keys or strings with either hand. Additionally, ambisinistrousness can be advantageous in sports that demand bilateral coordination, such as fencing or archery.

Left-handed products and tools

Recognizing the unique needs of left-handed individuals, there has been a growing market for specialized left-handed products and tools. From left-handed scissors with reversed blades to left-handed keyboards and computer mice, these products are designed to provide comfort and ease of use for left-handed individuals.

Left-handed desks and writing instruments with a slant towards the left are also available, enabling left-handed individuals to write without smudging the ink or experiencing discomfort. Additionally, specialized kitchen utensils, such as left-handed can openers and peelers, have been developed to facilitate food preparation for left-handed individuals.

The availability of these specialized products and tools has significantly improved the overall experience for left-handed individuals, allowing them to navigate a right-handed dominant world with greater comfort and efficiency.

Tips for left-handed individuals

If you are left-handed, here are a few tips to enhance your experience and make daily tasks more manageable:

  1. Embrace your left-handedness: Recognize that being left-handed is a unique and valuable trait that contributes to your individuality. Embrace it with pride and celebrate your differences.
  2. Seek out left-handed products and tools: Invest in specialized left-handed products and tools that cater to your needs. This will make everyday tasks more comfortable and efficient.
  3. Develop ambidexterity: Practice using your non-dominant hand to improve your ambidexterity. This can be done through simple activities such as brushing your teeth or writing short notes.
  4. Be aware of your surroundings: Pay attention to the layout of objects and tools in your environment. Make adjustments, if necessary, to ensure optimal comfort and functionality.
  5. Educate others: Inform friends, family, and coworkers about the challenges that left-handed individuals may face. By raising awareness, you can help create a more inclusive and accommodating environment for all.

Embracing and celebrating left-handedness

Left-handedness is a fascinating characteristic that has both advantages and challenges. It is important to recognize and celebrate the unique qualities that left-handed individuals bring to the world. By understanding the advantages of being left-handed, appreciating its presence in different cultures, acknowledging the accomplishments of famous left-handed individuals, and addressing the challenges and misconceptions surrounding left-handedness, we can create a more inclusive and supportive society for all individuals, regardless of their dominant hand. So, let us embrace and celebrate the power of left-handedness.

Celebrate your left-handedness! Share this article with your friends and family to spread awareness and appreciation for the advantages of being left-handed.

By Juliet Kinsey

Image Source: Photo by Sebastian Dumitru on Unsplash

Read more on our Blog from Juliet with articles like Stress Awareness Month

Lughnasa Celtic Harvest Festival

Lughnasa Celtic Harvest Festival

Lughnasa is one of four traditional Celtic harvest festivals.  It happens at the end of summer when the grains are ripening, but have not yet been harvested. Usually celebrated on the 1st of August, it marks the end of summer and the beginning of the second half of the year. It occurs halfway between the summer solstice and autumn equinox.

A History of Lughnasa

Lughnasa is an ancient Gaelic holiday, said to be in honour of the pagan god Lugh, and his mother Tailtiu. As well as the usual traditions of feasting and gathering, it is believed that this was when the Tailteann Games were held. Games included “the long jump, high jump, running, hurling, spear throwing, boxing, contests in swordfighting, archery, wrestling, swimming, and chariot and horse racing. They also included competitions in strategy, singing, dancing and story-telling, along with crafts competitions for goldsmiths, jewellers, weavers and armourers.”[Source]

Lughnasa is still celebrated today in Ireland as a holiday. It includes music, dancing, stories and crafts. Furthermore, One modern-day legacy of Lughnasa is “Reek Sunday”. This involves climbing up a mountain or hill. In Ireland, many people climb up Croagh Patrick in Co. Mayo., also known as “the Reek” hence the name “Reek Sunday.”

The Myth

The myth that Lughnasa is based on according to Máire MacNeill who wrote on it back in1962 is the following:

“[it involves] a struggle for the harvest between Lugh and Crom Dubh, another mythical god who stores the grain, which Lugh seizes for humanity. Often, this is portrayed as a struggle for ‘Eithne,’ a woman who symbolizes the grain. Also, Lugh combats and destroys another figure representing blight. ‘Óenach Tailten’ or ‘Aonach Tailteann’ was a ceremony held during Lughnasadh in commemoration of Tailtiu [Lugh’s mother].” Source  

The four feast days

As well as Lughnasa, there is Samhain, Imbolg and Beltane. These are all based on the harvest periods and seasons. Samhain is celebrated on the 31st of October and is linked to Halloween celebrations. People leave gifts for the dead to appease their spirits and festivities and bonfires are often lit. Imbolc or Imbolg is celebrated on the 1st of February and is a lesser know celebration. It marks the beginning of spring and rebirth of the land. The final festival, and a very big one for Edinburgh is Beltane. It happens on the first of May and involves a lot of dancing and bonfires. Why not visit Edinburgh this year and attend our Beltain event on the top of Carlton Hill.

Read more on Scottish history at librarysearch.napier.ac.uk

By Juliet Kinsey

Photo by Polina Rytova on Unsplash

Read more on Scottish history and Festivals with articles on:

The Edinburgh Festival

International Moon Day

International Moon Day

It was way back in the 5th century B.C. that Greek astronomer Anaxagoras correctly surmised that the moon was not a god, but a big rock with mountains on its surface. The sun, too, was a burning rock that “puts brightness into the moon”. These beliefs got him arrested and exiled, but he stuck by them. No doubt Anaxagoras would have been delighted when, 23 centuries later, three US astronauts landed on the big rock.

Apollo 11

It was on 20th July 1969 that Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin touched down on the moon. It was, you’ll recall, “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”.

The Apollo 11 lunar mission, one of the most daring engineering feats ever pulled off, lasted exactly eight days,18 minutes and 35 seconds. That was 54 years ago, but it was only last year that the first International Moon Day was recognised.

You may wonder why the moon needs its own special day. Well, sadly our only natural satellite is not immune from destructive human activity.  According to the United Nations, we need to ensure that moon exploration remains sustainable and peaceful. Indeed, the UN is so concerned about lunar safety that as early as 1967 the General Assembly adopted the “Magna Carta of Space”. The charter sets out principles governing the activities of states in the exploration and use of outer space.

Article three states that “the moon shall be used by all States Parties exclusively for peaceful purposes” and goes on to prohibit the use of the moon for threatening behaviour and mass destruction.

For more information, see here:

https://www.un.org/en/observances/moon-day

About us (unoosa.org)

As long as we don’t destroy it – or our own Earth – we’ll continue to be fascinated by the moon, and all other celestial bodies. Countless films and dramas have been set on the moon or other non-Earth locations. Fancy rewatching Apollo 13, The Dish or Neil Armstrong – First Man on the Moon?  Just log into BoB through LibrarySearch:

Search · BoB (learningonscreen.ac.uk)

By Lesley McRobb

Read about some Alien fun here 

Photo source Thula Na

« Older posts

© 2024 The Library Blog

Theme by Anders NorénUp ↑