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Libraries Week 2022

Libraries Week 2022

Libraries Week is an annual event held to celebrate the best that libraries have to offer. This year, Libraries Week takes place between the 3rd and 9th of October and will focus on the vital role libraries play in supporting individuals of all ages to access lifelong learning.

As part of Libraries Week, Edinburgh Napier Libraries and the University’s Special Collections are offering tours of the War Poets Collection led by our Special Collections Curator, Laura Cooijmans-Keizer.

The War Poets collectionLibraries week 2022

War Poets Collection 

It was at Craiglockhart War Hospital during the First World War, that Wilfred Owen (1893-1918) and Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967) first met and where some of their greatest poetry was inspired and written. As a tribute to these and other WWI poets, the University established the War Poets Collection in 1988, on the 70th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice. Since then, the collection has grown to include other histories, incorporating items from the building’s first establishment as a Hydropathic – the predecessor of a modern Spa – up to its current use as a campus of Edinburgh Napier University.

If you’d like to come along and learn more about this fascinating collection, Laura will be providing 30-minute tours of the War Poets Exhibition at Edinburgh Napier University’s Craiglockhart campus on the 6th and 7th of October. The exhibition provides a glimpse into the daily lives of the poets, patients, and medical staff at Craiglockhart during the time when the building was used as a war hospital. The collection features contemporary photographs, books, film, audio, and memorabilia, and offers visitors a unique insight into the important personal, social, and medical achievements that occurred within the walls of Craiglockhart War Hospital.

Book a tour

To book a place on one of the tours visit our Training and Events Calendar.

You can read previous blog articles on the War Poets Collection:

The Poet and the Doctor, Craiglockhart War Hospital 1917 (War Poets Collection)

War Poets Collection: Remembering Siegfried Sassoon

Visit our website to find out about all our Special Collections. (put links in here to website – napier.ac.uk not working just now)

By Sarah Jeffcott

May Day The Beginning of Spring

Springtime

Is there anything that gladdens the heart of the city-dweller more than the glorious pink of cherry- and the wondrous white of apple blossom lining the grimy streets? Personally, I feel my spirits soar every time I wander along an avenue of blossom and turn up my face to the delicate petals raining down like confetti. Laburnum, too, delights with its brief but brilliant burst of yellow. (Okay, so it’s poisonous, but nobody was planning to eat it!) May really must be the most beautiful and optimistic month, as the light stretches and the air starts to warm up after those nippy April mornings.

The History of May Day

Maybe it’s this abundance of light, colour and new growth that inspired our pagan ancestors to celebrate the beginning of the month. They’d elect a May Queen and a Jack-in-the-Green to lead the festivities which included dancing around the maypole (every village had one), painting faces green and dressing up a local person in a caricature of a horse. The fun continued after the Christian church was established until those killjoy C16th Puritans banned maypole dancing as a heathen activity of drunken wickedness (which to be fair, it probably was).

Recent Times

In recent times, May 1st has become synonymous with something much less frivolous and decidedly more serious: work. Labour movements across the world have inspired action since the earliest days of industrialisation, but official commemoration of May 1st as International Workers’ Day began in Chicago when, in 1886, the American Federation of Labor implemented an 8-hour working day as a new standard of fair practice. In 1904 it was adopted around the world, and now May 1st is recognised by many as a workers’ holiday.

Scotland

Closer to home, Beltane is a Gaelic festival of fire that is traditionally celebrated on May 1st to mark the beginning of, um, summer. In Edinburgh, revellers usually make their way up Calton Hill before celebrating en masse. If you want to take part in the organised event, you’ll have to set off the night before.  See https://beltane.org/

You may be familiar with the old proverb “ne’er cast a cloot til the May be oot.” You’d be forgiven for believing that the May in this case refers to the month, but in fact, it specifically refers to the May tree, an old name for hawthorn, that beloved staple of hedgerows across the land that produces a gorgeous white blossom in May. Hawthorn is the only plant in UK vernacular to be named after the month in which it blooms.

We hope you enjoy this Mayday, whether you’re working, strolling through a garden of cherry blossom, dancing around a maypole or warming yourself against a roaring communal fire. Bring on the summer!

By Lesley McRobb

Read more articles on celebrations here on our blog:

St Patricks Day

Chinese New Year

Scottish traditions

A Quick Guide to Finding a Book with LibrarySearch

Finding a book with LibrarySearch


Are deadlines coming up? Assignments due? And Google just won’t do. Our quick guide to finding a book with LibrarySearch that will save the day!

There are books, journals, peer-reviewed articles and much more. We have over 225 databases, 33 000 journals, 100 000 books and well over 300 000 e-books all available at your fingertips at LibrarySearch. We can’t sing the praises of LibrarySearch enough!!

That’s all great and everything but the question now is how does it work?

Simply go to librarysearch.napier.ac.uk, access it through our web pages or click the shortcut here.

Don’t forget to sign in the right-hand corner to give you full access.

librarysearch screenshot

In the search bar, type the book title. If you don’t have any books in mind, you can type the keywords for your subject area and let LibrarySearch do its magic. There are filters on the side to narrow down your search for example if you only want books and books for a certain decade and books from a certain campus.

Librarysearch screen shot

Once you’ve spotted a book that looks useful click on the link. You will be able to see if it’s available online or in one of our Campus Libraries. If it’s available online just click on the links to take you right on through to your book. If the book is on one of our shelves note down the Dewey Decimal number. It will tell you where your book is positioned. Afterwards, If you get stuck check out our guide or ask one of our lovely Librarians who will be happy to help!

All there to make life easier. Like we said LibrarySearch is there to save the day

By Maya Green

 

Discovered your book on LibrarySearch, but need help spotting it on the shelf? Try our Guide to the Dewey Decimal System here!

Still stuck finding something useful then why not check out our LibGuides

SCONUL Access Scheme. Accessing University and Higher Education Libraries

SCONUL Access Logo

The SCONUL Access Scheme: Accessing University and Higher Education Libraries

Overview of the Scheme

SCONUL (Society of Colleges, National and University Libraries) is a reciprocal scheme that allows staff and students of Edinburgh Napier University to access other participating higher education libraries within the UK and Republic of Ireland.

There are currently 182 SCONUL members(libraries) providing access to study space, borrowing or for reference only.  Access to computers and online resources is generally not permitted.  You will be able to login to the Eduroam network using your Edinburgh Napier University username and password.

 

Who can use this Scheme?

Eligible staff and students of Edinburgh Napier University can register for SCONUL Access.  You must be in good standing with the university and have no outstanding library fees/fines or overdue items on their library account.

Students must be fully matriculated and possess a current matriculation card.  Staff should possess a current staff card.

We ask that you always check the website of the library you wish to visit or call them directly for further information about the services available to you.  Some libraries may have added requirements you need to be aware of before visiting them.

How many libraries can I join?

You need only apply for SCONUL Access once.  After joining you will receive a confirmation email that will allow you to visit any of the participating libraries.

Please note that some libraries are not currently participating in the access scheme.

A full list of participating libraries and further information on how to join this scheme can be found on the SCONUL website  www.sconul.ac.uk

If you have any further questions about SCONUL Access please contact: SCONULEnquiries@napier.ac.uk

 

Learn more about what your Library has to offer here

A gentle reminder that access granted under the access scheme is a privilege and not a right.  Thank You.

 

By Carol Wilkie

 

Introducing a new database: IBISWorld

IBISWorld

Are you a student or member of staff looking for UK Industry Market Research data? Well the good news is that the Library now subscribes to the research industry database IBISWorld.  Covering a wide range of topics from accommodation and food service activities, to construction and transportation, it’s sure to have what you’re looking for!

The database has an easy-to-use and intuitive layout.  Each industry report has the same menu options; covering a variety of topics, including industry at a glance, industry performance, operating conditions and key statistics. In addition, you can create your own presentations with access to easily downloadable formats including Word, PowerPoint, Excel and PDF.  Whats more there are also new interactive charts allowing you to manipulate the data to work for you!

Interested? Access the database from the link on Keith Walker’s Business School Subject Guide or go to LibrarySearch  and navigate to it from the Databases link.

As a starting point I’d suggest going to your profile in the top right-hand corner of the screen.  You’ll find FAQs, useful tutorials and a short video to help you make the most of IBISWorld.

Right, I’m off to find information on the chocolate and biscuit production in the UK!

By Cathryn Buckham

 

LibGuides: What are they and why should you use them.

Picture of books on a library shelf

LibGuides

Libguides are a fantastic resource for finding information bespoke to your subject area. Our Librarians have spent time creating custom made guides that help you get the most relevant and useful information on your topic.

We currently have 27 different subject guides available with something to help everyone, no matter what you study.

There is a full list of the guides available here: https://libguides.napier.ac.uk/

You can scroll through the full list, or narrow your search by subject or Type.

Alternatively you can click on your Subject Librarian, and find a list of their guides as well as their contact information.

The clocks are changing

source: unsplash

Daylight saving time or British Summer Time (BST) will begin at 01:00 on Sunday 28th March so don’t forget to put your clocks forward! If you would like to know more about the history and reasons for daylight saving time you can find out more here, and there’s more information about the history of the UK time zone here.

Got some “time” to read?…Here’s some time related books in our collection:

Woman’s History Month: Wonder Women of Scotland

Woman’s History Month: Wonder Women of Scotland

To celebrate Women’s History month we thought it might be nice to celebrate some incredible Scottish women both alive and sadly gone. We can only fit in a few here so if you are interested in learning more, why not look up some more information at librarysearch.napier.ac.uk

Christina Miller

Photo of Christina Miller

Source: Heriot Watt University

One little know Scottish woman whose story deserves to be better remembered is Christina Miller. Despite being born both female and hearing impaired in 1899, and later losing her sight in one eye, she battled against the norms of the time to become a respected analytical chemist. She was an inspirational teacher and mentor to generations of students.

Miller was awarded the Keith Prize by the Royal Society of Edinburgh for her scientific paper on phosphorus trioxide, and become one of the first 5 to become elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh. There is even a building at the University of Edinburgh named after her.

Photo of Mukami McCrum

Source: British Library

Mukami McCrum

All-round amazing person, Mukami McCrum has lived in Scotland most of her life. She fights for women’s rights, in particular BAME and LGBT women who need support from domestic abuse. She is one of the founders of Shakti Women’s Aid and campaigns to end Female Genital Mutilation.

She was the chief executive of Central Scotland Racial Equality Council and has brought her deep commitment to race and gender justice to many organisations, including Akina Mama wa Afrika, World Council of Churches, Responding to Conflict Trust. She has an MBE for her community and human rights work.

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