Edinburgh Napier University

Category: Uncategorized (Page 2 of 6)

Black History Month

Black history month banner 2021

Black History Month 2021 runs throughout October and is a celebration of the often-overlooked contributions made by Black people to our shared history. It allows us to celebrate Black people and Black culture. This year the campaign is called “Proud to Be” and encourages Black and Brown people to share what they are “proud to be.”  

Here at the Library, we understand the importance not just of Black History month but also of continued action to tackle racism, reclaim Black history, and ensure Black history is represented and celebrated all year round. We are working hard to grow our collections so that they become more inclusive and diverse. 

Black history Month Image

What we are doing 

We have compiled two fantastic reading lists for you to enjoy filled with books, eBooks, films, and articles you can access not just this month but all year round. 

Links here: 

Black History 365 

Black History, Voices, and Innovation 

 Don’t forget you can use LibrarySearch to find even more sources, just log in and start searching. There is a useful guide available here 

Wear Red Day Icon

Wear Red Day

We will also be supporting Wear Red day on October 22nd – Show Racism the Red Card – Wear red day is a National Day of Action encouraging schools, businesses, and individuals to wear red and donate £1 to help fund anti-racism.

 

Displays

We will have displays on all our campuses, full of information and celebration of Black History and Culture, so keep an eye out when you visit us in person.

 

Walking Tour

The University group BAMEish will be running Black History Walking Tours with Lisa Willams. These will be running Thursday 14 October & Thursday 4 November.

Book here: Black History Walking Tour Eventbrite

Here are some useful Websites for you to look at:

There is also a brilliant reading list of books by CILIP which you can check out online here

There are some amazing talks from the British Library throughout October, which you can find here

Check out the official Black History Month site here

More Information on Black History in Scotland can be found here

Finally here is a link to what’s going on in Scotland this coming month.

 

Also, don’t forget to follow us on social media to see more of our Black History Month material

Instagram Twitter

You can read last year’s Black History Month post here.

 

 

Meet your Health and Social Care Librarian: Maria King

Introducing the Subject Librarian for the School of Health and Social Care, Maria King

Photo_of_Maria_King

I joined Edinburgh Napier in May and have worked in similar roles previously supporting health students at both Coventry University and The University of Salford and I’m looking forward to the move up to Edinburgh. I particularly enjoy the teaching and information literacy support aspects of the role.

I have an interest in punk pedagogy, a critical approach to teaching and learning which focuses on questioning and challenging dominant discourses. This influences my practice by increasing my reflection and improvement of my own practice, increasing flexibility of opportunities for engagement in learning, encouraging criticality and ownership of learning in students, and challenging practices of librarianship that dimmish under-represented voices and groups.

My other main area of interest and expertise is in inclusive teaching practices, specifically in relation to supporting neurodivergent students. I have previously delivered training support to other teaching staff to help them improve their own practices for supporting neurodivergent students. I am neurodivergent myself so bring lived experience to this area.

In my personal life, I enjoy discovering new restaurants, craft beer, quiz shows and pub quizzes, and reading – particularly crime! I am looking forward to exploring more of Scotland and increasing my step count!

Find out more information on the resources available in this subject area, and Maria’s contact details here.

You can access the Health and Social Care Libguides on the Library website. This Libguide will direct you to the most useful search tools for finding research-based literature/evidence, academic sources, grey literature, and reliable health statistics, and show you how to get the best out of these tools for your studies and professional practice.

Libraries Week 4-10 October 2021

Libraries Week Picture for 2021

Taking Action Changing Lives : Libraries Week 4-10 October 2021

It’s Libraries week again and this year we are celebrating the best that libraries have to offer. We are looking at how Libraries are drivers for inclusion, sustainability, social mobility and community cohesion. It’s all about how libraries are “taking action, changing lives”.

Here at Napier University Library, we try to play our part.

We are proud to have run food donation drives for our local food bank, Edinburgh North West Foodbank.

Poster for Food Bank Donations

Furthermore to help support our student’s mental health and wellbeing we have created a relaxation zone where they can escape from studying and take time out. We have produced a green space filled with games, colouring, magazines and books. Similarly, we have also created an online relaxation space here on our blog for you to use when you cannot be in the Library.

Library relaxation space

We also offer many services to help our students study such as offering a postal loans service, and in addition during the Pandemic a click and collect service on books. Not to mention buying thousands of eBooks to help our students study at home.

Staff at the Library are trained to be inclusive and considerate of all the people we come into contact with. We have even held the Customer Service Award for Excellence for over 10 years.

Above all, we try to consistently improve our services to make sure we offer ways to be more inclusive and considerate of all our users.

So Happy Libraries Week to everyone out there! We all hope you continue to love and appreciate Libraries everywhere.

Check out more information on Libraries week at: http://librariesweek.org.uk/ or follow the hashtag #LibrariesWeek on social media. Furthermore don’t forget to support your local Libraries and use them for the fantastic resource they are!

Dyslexia Awareness Week

Dyslexia Awareness Week

It is Dyslexia awareness week in the UK, and we are here to guide and increase visibility to people all over the world!  The theme this year is Breaking Through Barriers.

Dyslexia Awareness Week will take place between 03-09 October 2022.

But what is dyslexia?  

Dyslexia is a lifelong learning difficulty that can affect communication, learning, reading, and writing.  

You may be able to spot signs of this such as inconsistent spelling, sequencing, and order of words. Furthermore, as Dyslexia isn’t visible, individuals with dyslexia can often feel unsupported and may struggle with their mental health.  

What support is there? 

There are many supportive resources for Dyslexia, here are just some examples below: 

 

Post-it-notes

Organising thoughts with post-it notes.

 

You can find more information on Dyslexia in the links below:  

Link to the Offical Dyslexia Awareness Week website

Link to the British Dyslexia Association

Link to Dyslexia Scotland Website

You can find more support and information using the following link to our Shelf Help Guide

Please share your comments and thoughts with us! 

 

Edinburgh in the autumn

The Autumn Equinox has arrived in the Northern Hemisphere, and although this means damper and colder days in Edinburgh, the trees will exhibit amber glows, burnt oranges, and golden browns- perfect for walks and hikes.

 

Dean Village in the Autumn, Edinburgh

Dean Village in the Autumn, Edinburgh

 

It also means salvaging your favourite jumper and putting those boots back on! Be sure to also check out events that are happening during autumn such as:

 

· The Scottish International Storytelling Festival from 15th October-31st October 2021 was originally launched in 1989 to engage people in the magic of storytelling. There are usually live, storytelling performances, songs and tales. This year there will be a series of live and online events! Click here for more information.

· A spooky Halloween Edinburgh Ghost Tour of Old Town, 11.30pm 31st October 2021 at St Giles’ Cathedral steps

· There is also the Samhuinn Fire Festival on October the 31st on the top of Calton Hill, which celebrates the transition of Summer to Winter and a stand-off between the seasonal kings! If you want to see this performance visit Beltain.org

· Bonfire Night 5th November 2021- To get a full view of the display we recommend watching the displays from the top of Calton Hill!

 

 

Bonfire

Bonfire

 

You can find even more events in the link below:

https://www.whatsoninedinburgh.co.uk/events/all-events/2021/10/

 

Don’t let the weather dampen your spirit but remember to take your waterproof with you, wherever your next adventure awaits!

Starting University in September?

It can be both an exciting and a daunting time in your life… starting university! Perhaps you are moving to a new city or accommodation and feeling a whirlwind of different emotions.

University offers you a specific area of study to help pursue your career goals as well as everyday life independence and networking.

Here are some tips below to plan your next steps:

· Talk to friends, family, and colleagues about any concerns or tips for starting university.

· Pack essentials: kitchen accessories and utensils, food, laundry basket, bedding, stationery, laptop, and any other technological devices.

 

Utensils and Food

Utensils and Food

· Start a group on Whatsapp, Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter to get to know your flat or course mates! There is also a freshers page on Instagram you can join for 2021 you can keep up to date with https://www.instagram.com/napierfreshers/?hl=en

· You may also want to think about joining a society and finding people who have the same interests as you: https://www.napierstudents.com/

· Discount!? UNiDAYS and Student Beans offer discount on food, clothing and more. You can find this via the links: https://www.myunidays.com/GB/en-GB https://www.studentbeans.com/uk

 

Remember you have got this and you can always contact Napier for support too! https://www.napier.ac.uk/about-us/contact-us

You can find more help on starting at university in the link below: https://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/undergraduate/getting-started-at-uni

 

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Welcome to the Library: Introduction Sessions

Welcome to the Online Library

welcome sign outside library

This session will give you a quick introduction to using Edinburgh Napier University Library resources online.

We’ll demonstrate how to:

  • Find ebooks using LibrarySearch.
  • Find ejournal articles using LibrarySearch, and where to find specialist academic databases
  • Download the correct citation and permalink for items so that you can reference them in your University work.
  • Use LibrarySearch to organise your reading and search faster.

Welcome to the Library: Introduction Sessions

Welcome to the Physical Library

This session introduces the Campus Libraries and signposts to further support.

person holding booksWe’ll demonstrate how to:

  • Use the App to book study spaces, check your library account, add print credit and more.
  • Use the machines in libraries, like our printer/scanners, self-service checkouts and laptop loan safes.
  • Find a book on the shelf using the shelfmark number.

Introducing a new database: IBISWorld

IBISWorld

Are you a student or member of staff looking for UK Industry Market Research data? Well the good news is that the Library now subscribes to the research industry database IBISWorld.  Covering a wide range of topics from accommodation and food service activities, to construction and transportation, it’s sure to have what you’re looking for!

The database has an easy-to-use and intuitive layout.  Each industry report has the same menu options; covering a variety of topics, including industry at a glance, industry performance, operating conditions and key statistics. In addition, you can create your own presentations with access to easily downloadable formats including Word, PowerPoint, Excel and PDF.  Whats more there are also new interactive charts allowing you to manipulate the data to work for you!

Interested? Access the database from the link on Keith Walker’s Business School Subject Guide or go to LibrarySearch  and navigate to it from the Databases link.

As a starting point I’d suggest going to your profile in the top right-hand corner of the screen.  You’ll find FAQs, useful tutorials and a short video to help you make the most of IBISWorld.

Right, I’m off to find information on the chocolate and biscuit production in the UK!

By Cathryn Buckham

 

The First Modern Olympics

Despite Covid, Tokyo hosts the delayed summer Olympics of 2020 this month representing the ultimate challenge to the world’s top athletes.  Organisers estimate some 11,000 athletes, from 205 countries will compete in 330 events in 28 sports in front of TV audiences numbering billions. Today’s intense interest, however, contrasts markedly with the more haphazard nature of the very first modern Olympic Games held in Athens in 1896.   

 

Reproduction of the cover of the 1896 Olympics Official Report (Olympic Studies Centre)

Reproduction of the cover of the 1896 Olympics Official Report (Olympic Studies Centre) 

 

Then, 300 competitors, all men and mostly local, took part in 43 events in athletics, cycling, swimming, wrestling, weightlifting, fencing, gymnastics, shooting and lawn tennis. 

These sports, with the exception of shooting and tennis, would have been broadly familiar to any ancient Greek. However, some of the events, one armed weightlifting for example, appear slightly odd to us today. 

The indifference shown by the established sporting authorities to what they all then regarded as a passing fad meant that the non-Greek competitors tended to be sportsmen of the amateur and gentlemanly kind rather than necessarily the world’s best. 

Take the tennis, for example, a sport pretty unfamiliar in Greece at the time. The singles was won by an Irish undergraduate, named John Boland. Boland was spending the Easter holidays in Athens with a friend and had no intention of competing. However his friend, one of the local organisers, persuaded him to enter the tournament at the last minute. A recreational player, with little experience of competition, Boland ended up winning all his matches. 

He then repeated the feat in the doubles forming a scratch partnership with German player, Fritz Traun. Their success no doubt helped assuage Traun’s disappointment at having previously lost both in the singles and also in the 100 metres sprint.   

Unlike future winners of Olympic tennis, Boland did not enjoy a stellar career in the game. In fact there is no record of him ever winning anything again. He did, however, go on to serve as an MP for 18years. 

Carl Schuhmann was the most successful athlete at the games, winning both the individual vault and contributing to the Germans’ success in both team gymnastic events.  

 Bizarrely, Schuhmann then fought his way to the final of the wrestling where he faced local man, Georgios Tsitas. The contest turned into a two-day affair. Darkness forced an end to proceedings on the first day with Schuhmann winning his 4th medal on resumption the next morning.  

 

Carl Schuhmann and Georgios Tsitas at the 1896 Wrestling final (ac-wuestenrot.de)

Carl Schuhmann and Georgios Tsitas at the 1896 Wrestling final (ac-wuestenrot.de) 

 

To huge national acclaim the marathon, which actually started in Marathon, was won by an Athenian mineral water salesman Spyridon Louis. Hailed as a national hero, his colourful later life included serving jail time for falsifying papers. 

Rather than spending millions on purpose built stadia, as is the norm today, the Greeks used what they had available. The swimming events took place in the sea off Piraeus, 2 out of the 3 open events being won by a Hungarian Alfred Hajos. Entry to a fourth event was peculiarly restricted to members of the Greek Navy.  The Panathenaic Stadium hosted 4 sports, and the formal ceremonial. It was a refurbished facility excavated out of solid marble on the site of a stadium that hosted the ancient games dating back to 144CE.  The track, a narrow horseshoe shape, caused some runners problems when cornering. It’s still possible to channel one’s inner Olympian today and run round that same track provided you pay the stadium tour entrance fee of 5 euros. 

 

The Panathenaic Stadium Athens (Greeka.com)

The Panathenaic Stadium Athens (Greeka.com) 

 

Oddly no Gold medals where awarded. Gold, silver and bronze medals didn’t appear until St Louis in 1904. The first winners each received a silver medal and a laurel branch, runners up a copper medal. There was nothing for coming 3rd.  

Retrospectively, however, the IOC upgraded gold, silver and bronze to the top 3 in all the Athens events. 

From this fairly modest start and despite the initial lack of international enthusiasm the Games developed into the multi-million dollar extravaganza we are now enjoying. 

 

By John Baillie

« Older posts Newer posts »

© 2024 The Library Blog

Theme by Anders NorénUp ↑