Edinburgh Napier University

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What the Librarians are reading: Books we recommend!

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What the librarians are reading: Books we recommend! Part 1

Stumped for your next read? Curious what the book professionals are reading? Look no further!  Here’s a peek into what the staff here at Edinburgh Napier University Library (ENULibrary) have been reading over the last year.

Check out recommended books from all genres and Interests (we are a diverse lot!) Some are available right here at the Library, but for the books we don’t have, why not try your local library? Edinburgh City Libraries have a huge selection of books and we love supporting them.

The Book Reviews


Malcolm

tiny habits book cover“Tiny Habits” by B.J. Fogg.

“Recommended at a financial health webinar, and I read it over Xmas.  A great way to self-change behaviour is by breaking down desired changes in multiple areas into very tiny habits, which are much more easily achieved than big changes.  Prompt such habits by linking them to existing parts of your life, and celebrate when you successfully do them…it all helps to rewire them effectively into your brain.  Easy to read and to get started with. Recommended!”

 

story of tea book cover

“The Story of Tea: a cultural history and drinking guide” by M.L. Heiss and R.J. Heiss.

“All you need to know about teas of the world…production, history, and how to brew them. Lots of pictures. Say goodbye to teabags. Perfect for the Tea-head in your life!”

 

 


Emi

Chernobyl book cover“Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy” by Serhii Plokhy

“A very interesting and detailed insight about the 1986 disaster and its aftermath. The events are recreated by Ukrainian Professor Serhii Plokhy with detail and accuracy. At the same time, it’s quite interesting to read because the author tells the stories of the firefighters, scientists, engineers, workers, soldiers, politicians, and policemen who found themselves caught there and shows a lot about the nature of the Soviet political system and the flaws of its nuclear industry. As some reviews say, you can read it ” like a good thriller” and I found its less upsetting and disturbing than the recent TV show.”

You can borrow this one from us! Check out LibrarySearch

 

Pandoras Jar book coverPandora’s JarWomen in the Greek Myths by Natalie Haynes.

“It’s a must for those who, like me, love Greek myths. An enlightening essay about how women have been hidden, belittled or directly condemned in those myths retold many times.  The women’s narrative and its complexity have been misinterpreted through History and also Art, so I

enjoyed a lot reading about characters like Pandora, Medusa, and Medea and how they were not as virtuous or monstrous as they have been pictured (normally by men!).”

 


Maria

Study with me book cover“Study with me: effective bullet journaling techniques, habits, and hacks to be successful, productive, and organized” Shao, Jasmin andJagan, Alyssa

“I enjoyed it because I have only recently started bullet journaling and this book gives a good overview of the practical/organisational aspects of how to do it, and also guidance on how to make your journal more creative and interesting.

For anyone who hasn’t heard of bullet journaling before it is a customisable diary/planner that be as simple or complex as you choose to make it!”

You can read this book here, through the Library.


We will have another instalment soon of “What the Librarians are reading” so check back to the blog regularly.

Want some more suggestions right now? Check out our earlier post of book recommendations here!

International Day of Women and Girls in Science Friday 11th of February 2022

At Edinburgh Napier University, we want to celebrate all women and girls in science, from the past to the present day. Emerging from the shadows of history, women work together to find new inventions to improve the next generations. 

 

 

Microscope

Microscope

 

 

Here are some amazing Women Pioneers in Science that have and are helping to create a better future: 

 

  • Janaki Ammal was India’s first female plant scientist and Botanist. Ammal studied hybrid species and advocated for the biodiversity of India.  
  • Dorothy Lavinia Brown was the first African American female surgeon. She practiced in the South-eastern U.S. during the 1900s. 
  • Lauren Esposito is an arachnologist; you might be thinking what this means, and it involves a lot of legs… (a scientist who studies spiders and related animals such as scorpions)! But she is the only woman expert on scorpions in the world, and the co-founder of 500 Queer Scientists to boost awareness and recognition of LGBTQ+ people working in the STEM industry.  

 

Did you know that it is also estimated that only 25% of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Maths) are women? This shows that girls are often stereotyped from an early age in the classroom, as boys are more likely to pursue these subjects such as Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, and Computing. The sector needs to be more diverse, and Equate Scotland works with women to be more inclusive: 

https://equatescotland.org.uk/ 

 

Laboratory technician

Laboratory technician

 

 

At Napier, there are Scholarships in partnership with the British Council available for women from Southeast Asia that support their studies for health and life sciences.  

You can find more information in the links below: 

British Council Women in STEM (napier.ac.uk) 

https://www.britishcouncil.org/study-work-abroad/in-uk/scholarship-women-stem  

 

The library also has books available on Women and Girls in Science:

https://napier.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/44NAP_INST/n96pef/alma99560200102111

https://napier.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/44NAP_INST/n96pef/alma9923597423802111

 

Throughout the pandemic, women have been working on the front lines of covid-19 as scientists, health workers, and more. It is important to always recognise and value Women’s and girls’ contributions in STEM and how they are working to create a better life for us all.  

International Women in Engineering Day

We’ve come a long way since Evelyn Roxburgh graduated from Heriot-Watt College in 1923 with a diploma in electrical engineering – the first woman in Scotland to qualify as an electrical engineer. Evelyn spent much of her career in Metropolitan Vickers, one of the biggest engineering companies in the country.

And then there was Langholm-born Dorothy Buchanan who, in 1927, became the first female chartered engineer registered by the Institution of Civil Engineers and worked on engineering projects as far-flung as Sydney, Kharthoum and Belfast.

Nevertheless, there is still a huge gender imbalance in the scientific industries, and that’s why we need an International Women in Engineering Day. Now in its 8th year, INWED aims to raise the profile of women in engineering and inspire women and girls all over the world to enter the industry.  INWED is celebrated on 23rd June all over the world. See here for what’s happening in the UK.

Despite boys and girls having an equal interest in science and technology in their school years, only around 25% of workers in the STEM sector are women. Equate Scotland aims to help change this. It works with further education institutions, employers and students to develop women’s scientific expertise, skills and confidence. Find out about them here

Here at Edinburgh Napier, 20% of our staff and students in the School of Engineering & the Built Environment are female. We welcome girls and boys of all backgrounds.  Why not join us? Find out more here

 

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