Edinburgh Napier University

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International Games Month

International Games Month

International Games Month

 

 

International Games Month is our biggest and best yet! 

This year for International Games Month we’ve organised some exciting new activities for you! 

You’ll find links to all our activities (and Terms & Conditions for the games) here LibCal.napier.ac.uk 

Game-Based Searching Skills Support 

Looking for a fun way to learn academic searching skills, join our Subject Librarians in this fun game-based searching activity.  You’ll also have the opportunity to ask further questions!  We’ve organised one session for each campus register by following the link below.   

Craiglockhart 

Friday 11th November, 12 noon – 1.00 pm 

Merchiston 

Monday 14th November , 1.00 pm – 2.00 pm 

Sighthill 

Monday 21st November, 1.00 pm – 2.00pm 

 

Well-being Workshop-Video Games as Therapy-Online 

Did you know that games can be good for your well-being? 

In collaboration with our Well-being team, we’re really pleased to be able to offer this well-being workshop on video gaming and how it can be good for you.  This is an online session run through Webex and is open to staff and students. 

Wednesday 16th November, 2.00 pm – 4.00 pm 

Register for the event on your My Futures page 

 

Win an Amazon voucher! 

As in previous years, we’re giving students multiple opportunities to win an Amazon voucher!   

Play online, send your completed puzzle/quiz from your University email address to library@napier.ac.uk with the subject line International Games Month and we’ll enter correct entries into the draw to win a voucher. Paper copies of the Word Search and our Plot Keywords Quiz are available at each campus library if you prefer to hand in a paper copy.   

Complete the Logie the Lion Jigsaw  

Library Words Word Search 

New for 2023 our Plot Keywords Quiz ! Use the keywords provided to work out the title of the book which has been made into a film!  Click on the link at LibCal.napier.ac.uk to access the quiz sheet. 

 

Additional Games for you to play for fun! 

Slide the tiles to create a picture of Craiglockhart Library Relaxation Space 

Memory Gamematch the library to the correct campus 

 

Reading List 

 

Feedback 

We’d love to have your feedback on our International Games Month events.  Click on the link above! 

 

By Cathryn Buckham

Daylight Savings: The clocks are going back

How time flies! It’s Daylight savings once again. It hardly seems any time since we were reminding you to put your clocks forward for British Summer Time and now it is time to put them back again. We had a better summer than usual with lots of warm, sunny weather and we hope you enjoyed it.

Clocks go back by one hour at 2am on 31st October and that means shorter days and longer nights. This could be the perfect time to take up a new interest such as baking, knitting or yoga and you will find lots of useful tutorials on YouTube. You can also find a good variety of programmes to watch on the Box of Broadcasts database which can be accessed through Library Search.

You may want to join Edinburgh libraries to borrow or download books and catch up on some of the great ones available and the link to the main webpage is here.

Although it’s colder and darker there is still plenty to do such as winter walks and with covid restrictions eased there are lots of museums and galleries to visit and theatres are open for performances too. For more ideas read our article Edinburgh in the Autumn.

By Vivienne Hamilton

Image Source: Photo by Malvestida on Unsplash

 

International Literacy Day

International Literacy Day

International Literacy Day was originally founded by UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) and raises awareness of illiteracy globally.

Reading and writing are essential for our everyday lives, such as navigating signs, news, menus, and even labels on food. There are challenges with illiteracy, as approximately 771 million people still lack basic reading and writing skills.

UNESCO is holding a hybrid event and awards ceremony to remind everyone of the importance of literacy: You can find more information here

 

But what can be done to support literacy?

 

· Governments, schools, and communities can participate in activities to focus on illiteracy.

· Books can be donated to libraries and offer tuition to support success and development.

· Discussions, group sessions and 1-to-1s.

 

This year the theme is ‘transforming literacy learning spaces’ and at Edinburgh Napier University, we want to show how important spaces can be to ensuring inclusive education for everyone. For example, our group study rooms on resourcebooker.napier.ac.uk in the library provide a comfortable space for collaborative and group discussions, as well as technical equipment that can support development with researching and writing for dissertations and assignments.

 

What is the result of literacy?

Increasing literacy also gives people skills for employment with opportunities to develop and break the cycle of poverty, through small steps. It also provides people with knowledge and communication to express feelings and emotions.

 

You can find articles and books via the library search:

https://napier.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/44NAP_INST/19n0mho/cdi_gale_infotrac_456490000

https://napier.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/44NAP_INST/n96pef/alma9920385460102111

Our academic skills advisers are also here to help you on your university journey!

 

Further resources:

https://www.unesco.org/en/days/literacy-day https://nationaltoday.com/international-literacy-day/

Japanese Manga Art

Japanese Manga Art

What is Manga?

Manga is Japanese comics, and graphics, in newspapers, magazines and books, that emerged in the 1920s. The word consists of ‘man’, ‘whimsical’ and ‘pictures. Manga demonstrates stories of characters through pictures and expressive lines. It is usually printed in black and white due to cost savings; however special editions are printed in colour.

 

 

Comic style strip of Manga

Manga comic at Merchiston Library

 

History:

Although Manga emerged during the 20th century, the earliest association was found on scrolls created by Japanese, Buddhist monks in the 12th century. They depicted chapters of animals mirroring human gestures. Printing techniques flourished in the 19th century and Manga focused on politics, although the government censored artists and even closed publishers.

Post-World War II, American occupation of Japan influenced the style, so it became more animated and entertaining for readers. These were called ‘Red Books’ and have influenced more contemporary pictures and stories today that suggest emotions and actions.

 

Manga Genres:

The Manga sub-genres consist of romance, fantasy, horror, and adventure. The most popular and modern classics are Naruto, Sailor Moon, Dragon Ball Z, Fruit Basket, and Bleach. A lot of other Manga has been satirical and can focus on darker areas like corruption and injustices.

As Manga is mainly comic books, they have also become ‘anime’ meaning animations in Japanese. Anime uses movement to explain complex stories.

 

 

Image of Bleach character Manga

Bleach

 

 

So, if you are ready to read Manga, you may find that the print copies are not your usual way of reading as traditionally it is read back to front, from the top right to the left!

 

You can find Manga resources from how to master the art of drawing Manga to Bleach via the Library Search.

We even have clips available on the Library’s Box of Broadcasts.

Please let us know if you have any recommendations for the library!

 

Other resources:

https://www.carnegielibrary.org/an-introduction-to-manga/

https://blog.britishmuseum.org/an-introduction-to-manga/

The history of Sighthill Campus

A lot has changed since John Napier was born in the tower at Merchiston Castle in 1550, during turbulent times for Scotland.

Times are still a little turbulent… but what would Napier think of our modern-day university campuses?

As you may know, Edinburgh Napier has 3 campus locations – at Merchiston, Craiglockhart and Sighthill. Not long after being renamed Edinburgh Napier university in 2009 (previously Napier University), the University opened its brand new £60m Sighthill campus in 2011.

 

 

Sighthill campus

Sighthill Campus, photograph from Edinburgh Napier Image Bank

 

Situated in the west of Edinburgh, sights of Sighthill include Burton’s biscuit company, Edinburgh Beer Factory, Edinburgh College  and of course our own Edinburgh Napier Sighthill Campus.

More than 5000 students choose to study at Sighthill campus, which houses the School of Health and Social Care (SHSC) and the School of Applied Sciences (SAS).

Applied sciences courses include Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Marine Biology and Conservation, as well as Sport Sciences, Social Sciences, Psychology, Policing and Careers Guidance. Facilities include Sport and exercise science labs, biotech labs and an environmental chamber to simulate high altitude conditions!

Health and Social care courses include Nursing, Midwifery, Allied Health professions and Social Work, as well as Health & Social Care Sciences. Step inside and you’ll find a 1000 sq metre Clinical skills centre with hospital wards, where students can treat ‘patients’ in a life-like setting.

https://www.napier.ac.uk/about-us/our-location/our-campuses/sighthill

 

 

image of nurse and training dummy

Nursing, photograph from Edinburgh Napier Image Bank

 

The opening of the 2011 Sighthill campus, with its brand new 5 storey Learning Resource Centre library, meant the bringing together of staff from a number of small ‘school of health’ libraries at Livingston St John’s hospital, Canaan Lane campus which was on the grounds of the Astley Ainslie Hospital and Comely Bank campus which was situated within the Western General Hospital’s grounds.

However, Edinburgh Napier was present at Sighthill long before 2011!

Sighthill Campus was originally opened in 1968 as custom-built accommodation for Edinburgh College of Commerce. The Edinburgh Corporation established the college in 1966 and subjects taught here would have included management and business studies – which you will now find at Craiglockhart campus!

In 1974, Edinburgh College of Commerce was amalgamated with Napier College of Science & Technology – and Napier College of Commerce & Technology was born. In 1986, Napier College became Napier Polytechnic, and then Napier University in 1992.

 

Notably, in 1984, her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and HRH Duke of Edinburgh came to Sighthill campus to open the newly refurbished library! The library was given the apt name of ‘The Queens Library’.

 

 

Image of her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to open Sighthill Library

Queen Elizabeth II opened Sighthill Library

 

 

Our present-day Sighthill LRC has a range of study environments fit for any royalty 👑 👑 👑!.

Across 5 floors, we have around 300 networked computers, spaces for laptops, study booths and collaborative desks for group work.

Our book collections are spread across the 3rd and 4th floors, with group study rooms, silent study areas and a relaxation space also available.

You can also borrow laptops from our LapSafe or ask for help at our Help Desk on LRC2.

Want to know more? Find out here.

 

Sources:

https://www.napier.ac.uk/about-us/our-history

https://www.napier.ac.uk/about-us/our-location/our-campuses/sighthill

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edinburgh_Napier_University

https://my.napier.ac.uk/library/about-the-library/sighthill

Seath, G. (2017). Beyond Logarithms & Bones: A short history of John Napier and his legacy.

The Napier Estate: past and present. (2007). Napier University.

 

By Judy Wheeler

World Emoji Day: Sunday the 17th of July 2022

Today is World Emoji Day! 😋😍🤣

 

But what exactly is an emoji and where did they come from?

 

Emojis are popular icons that demonstrate how we feel, our emotions, moods and expressions. For example, a smiley face represents that we are happy 😊. They are used to communicate in texts on our phones 📱, emails 📧 on our laptops or tablets 💻, and even on professional channels like Microsoft Teams! Most of the emojis are animated to exaggerate the sender’s emotions.

 

It originally derives from the Japanese word, ‘kanji’ meaning picture. The great thing about emojis is that no words are needed to describe how you feel- it is all pictorial!

In 1999 Japanese artist Shigetaka Kurita created the first 176 emoji while working for mobile internet service. You can see this work at the New York’s Museum of Modern Art

 

 

Exhibition of Emojis

Exhibition of Emojis https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/emoji-shigetaka-kurita-standards-manual/index.html

 

 

In 2007 Google was the first to incorporate them into Gmail (email service). But it was not until 2010 that the emojis were released on both an iPhone and Android, and now each emoji has an unlimited resolution.

Emojis create a culture of inclusivity that helps some neurodiverse users to communicate more easily when online. They can use pictorial emojis as a communication method that helps their sensory processing. Emojis produce visibility and give users voices, through the power of pictorial expression, representation, and storytelling. Apple has even proposed new emojis that represent people with hearing aids and prosthetic limbs.

 

https://worldemojiday.com/ 

 

Emojis can even be used to show phrases not just expressions or emotions.

So, can you guess the title of these books through emojis? You can also find these on our Library Search.

 

1. 🕰️🍑 (Clue: Time is ticking for this book and film adaptation)

 

2. 🧛‍♀️ (Clue: This 1897 gothic novel is something to sink your teeth into…)

 

3.  👩🐉💉(Clue: Look behind you for this mythical, fire-breathing reptile)

 

4. 🐦🎵 (Clue: It may have wings and like to chirp, but this novel brings more awareness to the experience of war).

 

 

Leave your answers below, alongside your favourite emoji! 😁

 

By Jemma Lidgard

The Edward Clark Collection

Hidden treasures: The Edward Clark Collection

The Edward Clark Collection, housed in the library at the Merchiston campus, is not as well-known as it should be. It is one of the only two surviving examples of what was once a widespread phenomenon in Britain: printers’ libraries. The other survivor is St Brides Library in London.

The Edward Clark Collection consists of around 5,000 items illustrating the development of the book from the 15th century. More specifically, it concentrates on the development of typography, the techniques of printing illustrations, and fine bindings. The collection is located within the Campus Library at the University’s Merchiston Campus.

Printers’ Libraries

The first Edinburgh printers’ library was established in 1858. The technical and reference collections continued to be used up until the end of the 19th century, afterwich it is not clear what happened to them. Formal educational requirements for printing apprentices were established after World War I. The Clark Collection was put together as a teaching resource, mainly in the 1930s, to illustrate printing technologies, type design and book production from the 15th century to the present day. As well as the treasures highlighted on the Collection website it is a treasure trove for the historian of print.

Over the last 2 years, whenever access was possible, I have consulted type specimens, trade journals, company histories, technical manuals and books about print production and the design and making of books. These included James Watson’s History of Printing in Scotland (1713), Caleb Stower’s Printer’s Grammar (1808) and T.C. Hansard’s Typographia (1825), and looked again at a long-standing favourite of mine – John McCreery’s poem The Press, printed in Liverpool as a type specimen in 1802.

It is a privilege to work with this collection, and I am very grateful to all the library staff who have made this possible.

Dr Helen S Williams

Honorary Edward Clark Fellow

h.williams@napier.ac.uk

Unusual Libraries from the UK

Image Source

University libraries tend to be large spaces with shelves with thousands of books, computers and study spaces. Students are used to and expect to have these facilities. You may also use public libraries which may not be as big, but still house a huge variety of books and other resources, but not all libraries are the same……

Here are two Unusual Libraries from the UK

Bethnal Green tube station library

When war broke out in 1939 Bethnal Green Underground station was partly completed, and work was halted. In late 1940 it was decided that as the works were far enough ahead it could be used as a safe shelter for the public during air raids. Over a period of months, the station was transformed to house enough bunks to sleep up to 5000 people, a café, theatre and a nursery. This community 78 feet underground also gained a library in 1941-Britain’s only tube station library.

In September 1940 a bomb had fallen on the roof of Bethnal Green Public Library causing vast destruction to the adult learning library. Librarian George F. Vale and his deputy Stanley Snaith pulled a tarpaulin over the shattered glass dome roof and vowed to bring a library to the underground community. The council approved a grant of £50 and a library was created over the boarded-up tracks of the westbound tunnel. Stanley Snaith wrote “All last summer the caverns echoed to the din of hammers and saws. The result was a triumph.” Later in the Library Review 1942, he wrote “Libraries in converted shops, in village halls, in mobile vans are common enough. But libraries in tube shelters are something new under the sun.”

The tiny library measured 15 feet square and opened from 5.30-8pm every evening. It housed 4000 titles that had survived the bombing of the main library. Romances, classics, poetry and children’s books could be borrowed and help the residents to escape from the horrors happening above ground. Snaith wrote of his patrons, “Each dusk sees the first contingent making its way down to the bowels of the earth. The well and the ill, the old and the young, they come trooping down… In the library the youngsters are vocally busy with their book selection, but why should they not chatter to their heart’s content.” Now the “youngsters” are in their 90’s, but they still have fond memories of the tube station library. Pat Spicer, now 92 said, “You can’t imagine what that library represented to me as a place of safety. It sparked a lifelong love of reading.”

As the war dragged on many would have been anxious about what the future held, but in October Bethnal Green Library celebrates its centenary and tube trains still come and go from Bethnal Green station.

Phone box libraries 

Across the UK many redundant old red phone boxes have found a new use as micro libraries. This is often in rural areas which have been affected by cuts to spending on public libraries due to cuts in local council funding. The idea is simple-anyone can take a book home, but they are expected to bring it back or bring a replacement.

The first phone box library was set up in 2009 in Westbury-Sub-Mendip following cuts to the mobile library funding. The parish council purchased the box for £1 and locals put up wooden shelves and donated books.

These micro libraries operate on a system of trust and house a large range of titles from cookery books to classics and children’s books. In villages where everyone knows everyone, the system works well, but in some cities, micro libraries have been vandalised and the local community has had to fund and carry out repairs.

These are just 2 examples of libraries in unusual places. If you would like to find out about some other unusual libraries click on the links below:

The Worlds Oddest Libraries

Donkey Libraries of Columbia

ReadingClub2000

Also, check out our amazing article on

Wilderness Libraries of edamalakudi

 

By Vivienne Hamilton

St. Patrick’s Day

Happy St. Patrick’s Day to all our Irish students and staff.

St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated on 17th March. St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland, but there are parades and parties worldwide due to the large numbers of people with Irish heritage spread across the world.

dog in st patricks day hat

Source

History of St.Patrick’s Day

Although there are no exact dates of his birth, it is believed that Patrick was born in the Roman-occupied north of England. and that he died on 17th March. His autobiographical work “Confessio” claims that when he was around 16, Patrick was taken from his home in Britain by Irish pirates who took him to Ireland as a slave. There he looked after animals for around six years and converted to Christianity. He fled captivity after hearing a voice telling him he would soon go home. He found passage on a ship and after several days walking he returned home. Following his return, Patrick studied Christianity in Europe-mostly in Auxerre, France and was ordained into the priesthood there. He later returned to Ireland as a missionary, and by the 7th century was already revered as the patron saint of Ireland.

The Irish Potato Famine

There are many people throughout the world with Irish ancestors due to the large numbers who emigrated because of the Irish Potato Famine. It started in 1845 when a fungus ruined around 75% of the annual potato crop, which most of the population relied on for food. Around one million Irish died before the end of the famine in 1852. Another million emigrated to countries such as Great Britain or the United States, and therefore you will find St. Patrick’s Day celebrated in many countries worldwide.

Celebrations

Today descendants of the immigrants celebrate their Irish heritage dressing up in colourful clothing in green and gold (the colours of the Irish flag), joining parades of pipe bands, cheerleaders, and floats. One of the biggest parades outside Ireland is in New York which held its first parade in 1762. This was a time when the wearing of green was a sign of Irish pride but was banned in Ireland. The parade gave participants the freedom to speak Irish, wear green, sing Irish songs and play the pipes to Irish tunes that were meaningful to the Irish immigrants of that time.

Aside from parades, many pubs and restaurants host events with live music and singing, and you shouldn’t have to look too hard to find one in Edinburgh!

By Vivienne Hamilton

Read more on world festivals and traditions with our articles:

Chinese New Year

Scottish Traditions: Burn’s Night

The Ethiopia Timkat Festival,

New Year Traditions from Around the World

Also, don’t forget you can find out more about everything mentioned in this article at Librarysearch.napier.ac.uk

 

 

🏳️‍🌈LGBT+ History Month 🏳️‍🌈

Celebrating LGBT+ History Month

February is the month we celebrate LGBT+ History here in the UK. It is a month-long celebration of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and non-binary history, including the history of LGBT+ rights and related civil rights movements. In the United Kingdom, we celebrate it in February to coincide with the 2003 abolition of Section 28.

What we are doing

Here at the Library, we think it is incredibly important to support and promote equality and diversity. Furthermore, we are working hard to create more inclusive collections and to support our LGBT+ users and staff. For example, we are currently creating a permanent LGBT+ virtual bookshelf here on our blog, and we are training our staff to be inclusive in their actions and the language they use.

Resources

If you are an LGBT+ student you can join Edinburgh Napier’s LGBT+ Society.   You can also find out more about the student LGBT+ community on the Queer Napier site. Staff can join the University’s thriving LGBT+ Network or you can visit our web pages to learn more about becoming an ally.

In addition, The Library has a wealth of books and articles on the subject. From the history of LGBT+ rights to current Legal information to keep you informed. Use LibrarySearch to find what you are looking for, or contact us for help with any of your research needs. 

Here are some items available through the Library to get you started: 

Same-sex, different politics: success and failure in the struggles over gay rights

Lgbt Activism and the Making of Europe A Rainbow Europe  

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans people (LGBT) and the criminal justice system

Equality

Pride Parades and LGBT Movements: Political Participation in an International Comparative Perspective

Similarly, want to know more about Pride Month?  Check out our article here.

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