Edinburgh Napier University

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Places to Visit in Lesser Known Edinburgh

Places to Visit in Lesser Known Edinburgh

Edinburgh Castle, the Palace of Holyrood and Greyfriar’s Bobby statue are some of the most popular attractions for visitors to Edinburgh.  However, there are lots of other attractions which are less well-known but just as interesting and pleasant to visit. Here are a few of them:

Museum of Childhood

This can be found on the Royal Mile but is often overlooked by guidebooks. A treasure trove of old children’s toys, games, clothes and playthings.

The People’s Story

Housed in the Canongate Tolbooth at the bottom of the Royal Mile it houses collections which tell the stories of the working-class people of Edinburgh from the late 18th century to the present day using oral history, reminiscence and written sources.

The Pentland Hills Regional Park

Just south of Edinburgh these hills are the highest points around the city and are often covered in snow in the winter. There are many walks over the hills with an abundance of wildlife. There is also a dry ski slope should you want to try out a new pastime. Easily accessible on public transport.

Dean Village

Situated five minutes away from Princes Street, visitors can find the Dean Village, a beautiful oasis right by the Water of Leith. In the past the village housed mills of various kinds, and the remnants of the industry can still be seen today. Look out for mill stones and carved stone plaques with baked bread and pies. Follow the walkway along the Water of Leith and you will come to the impressive Dean Bridge designed by Thomas Telford, and the classical temple of St Bernard’s Well.

Places to visit in Edinburgh Dean Village

Surgeon’s Hall Museums

Just a short walk from the Royal Mile, the Surgeon’s Hall Museums are a unique collection. Full of surgical tools, fascinating paintings and more than a few body parts in jars. Learn about the evolution of surgery throughout the ages and find how great Scottish minds brought us some of the medical breakthroughs we take for granted today. The present Surgeon’s Hall was designed by William Henry Playfair and completed in 1832. It is a category A listed building.

Gardens Dr. Neil’s Garden

This is located beside Duddingston Kirk on the lower slopes of Arthur’s Seat. Created from a wilderness by Drs Nancy and Andrew Neil. Two features of particular interest are the physic garden, which grows medicinal plants, and Thomson’s Tower. It was constructed in 1825 and was originally built for the Duddingston Curling Society. This was back when frozen lochs were the grounds for curling and other winter sports.

Kyoto Friendship Garden

This Japanese garden can be found in the grounds of Lauriston Castle in the Edinburgh suburb of Cramond. With bamboo shelters to picnic in, breath-taking views over Cramond Island to the Firth of Forth, avenues of blossom trees and calming water features. It’s no surprise that it is rated one of the top three Japanese gardens in Britain. The garden was created to celebrate the twinning of the towns of Edinburgh and the prefecture of Kyoto in Japan. It was opened in 2002. Its official name is ‘Castle Garden to Water and Beyond’. Continue reading

A Quick Guide to Finding a Book with LibrarySearch

Finding a book with LibrarySearch


Are deadlines coming up? Assignments due? And Google just won’t do. Our quick guide to finding a book with LibrarySearch that will save the day!

There are books, journals, peer-reviewed articles and much more. We have over 225 databases, 33 000 journals, 100 000 books and well over 300 000 e-books all available at your fingertips at LibrarySearch. We can’t sing the praises of LibrarySearch enough!!

That’s all great and everything but the question now is how does it work?

Simply go to librarysearch.napier.ac.uk, access it through our web pages or click the shortcut here.

Don’t forget to sign in the right-hand corner to give you full access.

librarysearch screenshot

In the search bar, type the book title. If you don’t have any books in mind, you can type the keywords for your subject area and let LibrarySearch do its magic. There are filters on the side to narrow down your search for example if you only want books and books for a certain decade and books from a certain campus.

Librarysearch screen shot

Once you’ve spotted a book that looks useful click on the link. You will be able to see if it’s available online or in one of our Campus Libraries. If it’s available online just click on the links to take you right on through to your book. If the book is on one of our shelves note down the Dewey Decimal number. It will tell you where your book is positioned. Afterwards, If you get stuck check out our guide or ask one of our lovely Librarians who will be happy to help!

All there to make life easier. Like we said LibrarySearch is there to save the day

By Maya Green

 

Discovered your book on LibrarySearch, but need help spotting it on the shelf? Try our Guide to the Dewey Decimal System here!

Still stuck finding something useful then why not check out our LibGuides

SCONUL Access Scheme. Accessing University and Higher Education Libraries

SCONUL Access Logo

The SCONUL Access Scheme: Accessing University and Higher Education Libraries

Overview of the Scheme

SCONUL (Society of Colleges, National and University Libraries) is a reciprocal scheme that allows staff and students of Edinburgh Napier University to access other participating higher education libraries within the UK and Republic of Ireland.

There are currently 182 SCONUL members(libraries) providing access to study space, borrowing or for reference only.  Access to computers and online resources is generally not permitted.  You will be able to login to the Eduroam network using your Edinburgh Napier University username and password.

 

Who can use this Scheme?

Eligible staff and students of Edinburgh Napier University can register for SCONUL Access.  You must be in good standing with the university and have no outstanding library fees/fines or overdue items on their library account.

Students must be fully matriculated and possess a current matriculation card.  Staff should possess a current staff card.

We ask that you always check the website of the library you wish to visit or call them directly for further information about the services available to you.  Some libraries may have added requirements you need to be aware of before visiting them.

How many libraries can I join?

You need only apply for SCONUL Access once.  After joining you will receive a confirmation email that will allow you to visit any of the participating libraries.

Please note that some libraries are not currently participating in the access scheme.

A full list of participating libraries and further information on how to join this scheme can be found on the SCONUL website  www.sconul.ac.uk

If you have any further questions about SCONUL Access please contact: SCONULEnquiries@napier.ac.uk

 

Learn more about what your Library has to offer here

A gentle reminder that access granted under the access scheme is a privilege and not a right.  Thank You.

 

By Carol Wilkie

 

The Dewey Decimal Classification System

Photo by Susan Q Yin on Unsplash

History

This Organisational system was conceived by Melvil Dewey in 1873 and first published in 1876. It is one of the most widely used in the world.

Use

The DDC as it is shortened to, is used to organise books by subject. Each item is given a shelf mark identifier so it can be located easily. The main subject areas are:

000        Computer science, information, and general work

100        Philosophy and psychology

200        Religion

300        Social sciences

400        Language

500        Science

600        Technology

700        Art and recreation

800        Literature

900        History and geography

The first 3 digits are the main subject area.  The numbers after the point give a subsection. After the numbers there are 3 letters to represent the author or editor. For example 941.34  DAI This refers to a book on Edinburgh by David Daiches.  Books with the same DDC number are shelved first by their number, then in alphabetic order by author or Editor.

If you want a very fun (and most definitely silly) video on how to find a book, this YouTube video is perfect:

A Guide to Beating Exam Stress

A Guide to Beating Exam Stress

It might be hard to believe, but exams are nearly here and 2022 is nearly over. I know, right!?

The exam period can be a highly stressful time, and it’s understandable you may be feeling overwhelmed, stressed or unsure about how to manage yourself and your time. If you’re looking for help, there are a number of places you can go to find it.

Our libraries are open to you for individual and group study. We’ve got a great variety of resources if you’re in need of some study tips, no matter where you are in your academic journey. Pop on over to our exam support reading list for resources on studying smart, mindfulness, taking successful exams, study skills, and beating stress.

Here are our top tips to help get you through.

Top Tips for Beating Exam Stress

1. Timetable and prepare a study plan.

2. Create a study space that is comfortable, quiet, well-lit, organized, and has no distractions nearby.

3. Put your information into a format that allows you to absorb it best.

4. Take regular study breaks. Alternating subjects you’re studying will also help.

5. Remember self-care!

6. Schedule fun activities to reduce your stress.

7. Eat nutritious foods and exercise regularly to keep your brain power and energy up!

8. Make sure you have all the items you need for any exams. Get them ready the day before to avoid rushing on the day.

9. Remove anything distracting to help you focus. Try putting your phone in a different room when revising.

10. Write down revision targets for the day, review your progress, and update your revision timetable and targets appropriately.

Most of all:  Remember to rest – get a good night’s sleep – and also relax! Check out our Virtual Relaxation Space, Or one of our special exam chillout areas in all our Libraries. You can find them next to the relaxation zones.

Keep an eye out on our Digital screens for more exam tips. Here’s a taster:

Further Support

Please do remember that if you’re experiencing difficulties, get in touch with Napier’s Counselling & Mental Wellbeing service. Drop them an email at counselling@napier.ac.uk or call them on 0131 455 2459.

Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash

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