Edinburgh Napier University

Tag: Edinburgh

🏳‍🌈 Celebrating Pride Month at Edinburgh Napier University

The month of June is Pride Month and here at the Library we “pride” ourselves on being an inclusive and welcoming place to visit. We thought it might be interesting to share with you some history about Pride Month and show you some resources for learning more about LGBTQ+ culture.

The reason that Pride occurs in June is because it marks the date of the Stonewall riots in America. This was a significant turning point in LGBTQ+ rights, galvanising movement towards greater equality. The first Pride parade occurred a year later on the anniversary of the riot, and parades around the world have marked the occasion ever since.

Pride Month is a celebration of how far LGBTQ+ rights have come and about bringing attention to work that still needs to be done. It’s also about having a lot of fun and some truly fabulous parades!

If you are an LGBTQ+ student you can join Edinburgh Napier’s LGBTQ+ Society or find out more about the student LGBTQ+ community on the Queer Napier site. Staff can join the University’s thriving LGBTQ+ Network or visit our web pages to learn more about becoming an ally.

The Library has a wealth of books and articles on the subject. From the history of LGBTQ+ rights to current Legal information to keep you informed. Use LibrarySearch to find what you are looking for, or contact us for help with any of your research needs. 

Here are some items available through the Library to get you started: 

Same-sex, different politics: success and failure in the struggles over gay rights

Lgbt Activism and the Making of Europe A Rainbow Europe  

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans people (LGBT) and the criminal justice system

Happy Pride Month 2021! 🏳‍🌈🌈🏳‍🌈

Mental Health Awareness Week 2021: Thriving with Nature

Nature is an incredible resource for maintaining our mental health. Simply being outside and experiencing green spaces has proven beneficial to us. Health Awareness Week 2021 is all about the potent value of nature on our minds. Spending time in nature and connecting with the natural world is a free and positive way to help us live happier lives.

Numerous studies on the subject make connections between experiencing nature and improvements to our psychological health, such as the study Understanding Nature and Its Cognitive Benefits by Kathryn E. Schertz and Marc G. Berman . Being in nature can even help you study. Researchers found that taking micro breaks to view a meadow green rooftop improved student’s attention rates. Read more about it here.

Looking for ideas of what to do and where to visit? The Scottish wildlife trust has many options:

Scottish wildlife trust logo

On your own and would like to not only connect with nature but people? There is an Edinburgh meetup group you can join here:

meetup logo

For a detailed guide on how to use nature to thrive, you can read this free PDF from Mentalhealth.org and  if you need any help or support, you can find it here.

 

The Dewey Decimal Classification System

Photo by Susan Q Yin on Unsplash

History

This Organisational system was conceived by Melvil Dewey in 1873 and first published in 1876. It is one of the most widely used in the world.

Use

The DDC as it is shortened to, is used to organise books by subject. Each item is given a shelf mark identifier so it can be located easily. The main subject areas are:

000        Computer science, information, and general work

100        Philosophy and psychology

200        Religion

300        Social sciences

400        Language

500        Science

600        Technology

700        Art and recreation

800        Literature

900        History and geography

The first 3 digits are the main subject area.  The numbers after the point give a subsection. After the numbers there are 3 letters to represent the author or editor. For example 941.34  DAI This refers to a book on Edinburgh by David Daiches.  Books with the same DDC number are shelved first by their number, then in alphabetic order by author or Editor.

If you want a very fun (and most definitely silly) video on how to find a book, this YouTube video is perfect:

Get Creative! Ideas for relaxing

Photo of craft items. Wool, watch, paper and camera

Photo by Giulia Bertelli on Unsplash

Get Creative!

Stress awareness month is here and as our work, study and life balances are interrupted due to the pandemic, we yearn for a breathing space or some creative vitality in our lives. Here are some tips below on how to get more creative!

Knitting or Sewing

Knitting doesn’t just have to consist of socks and scarves. The repetition of stitches can be a way of calming the mind from the everyday stresses of the pandemic. You could add new embroidered designs to your garments or repair any odd holes or two! This fantastic Box of Broadcasts documentary tells you about the history of knitting and how it has become the people’s craft in Britain

Want to learn how to knit? You can access the online eBook Knitting for Dummies through Librarysearch.

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Scrapbooking

Did you know Scrapbooking first began in the United Kingdom during the 19th Century? All you need is a plain paged scrapbook, journal or book to keep your memories alive! You can add photographs, fabrics, objects, quotes, colours, and materials that you have collected or bring you a sense of comfort. You can find more about the psychological benefits on scrapbooking in the book Creative Nostalgia: Social and Psychological Benefits of Scrapbooking, available through Librarysearch.

Photo of scrapbooking amterials

Photo by Estée Janssens on Unsplash

Blogging

Blogging provides a platform for self-expression and to communicate information with others online. Wix and WordPress are free blogging sites where you can begin to share your thoughts, passions, and ideas to a worldwide audience.

Find more information on how to carve your own digital footprint via https://blogs.napier.ac.uk/

Photo by Corinne Kutz on Unsplash

Article by Jemma Lidgard

The Annual Library Easter Egg Hunt

Easter egg hunt picture

Our annual Easter Egg Hunt is back and this time we have gone virtual! There are some fantastic prizes to be won so why not have a go! You can enter the competition through our Social media accounts on either Instagram or Twitter

To play: find and click on the Easter Eggs in this picture, which will lead you to Easter themed questions. Use LibrarySearch to find all 6 answers. Send them by DM to us on Instagram or Twitter  to be in with a chance to win  Amazon vouchers: 1st place £30, 2nd place £25 and 3rd place £10 Good luck!

The clocks are changing

source: unsplash

Daylight saving time or British Summer Time (BST) will begin at 01:00 on Sunday 28th March so don’t forget to put your clocks forward! If you would like to know more about the history and reasons for daylight saving time you can find out more here, and there’s more information about the history of the UK time zone here.

Got some “time” to read?…Here’s some time related books in our collection:

Woman’s History Month: Wonder Women of Scotland

Woman’s History Month: Wonder Women of Scotland

To celebrate Women’s History month we thought it might be nice to celebrate some incredible Scottish women both alive and sadly gone. We can only fit in a few here so if you are interested in learning more, why not look up some more information at librarysearch.napier.ac.uk

Christina Miller

Photo of Christina Miller

Source: Heriot Watt University

One little know Scottish woman whose story deserves to be better remembered is Christina Miller. Despite being born both female and hearing impaired in 1899, and later losing her sight in one eye, she battled against the norms of the time to become a respected analytical chemist. She was an inspirational teacher and mentor to generations of students.

Miller was awarded the Keith Prize by the Royal Society of Edinburgh for her scientific paper on phosphorus trioxide, and become one of the first 5 to become elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh. There is even a building at the University of Edinburgh named after her.

Photo of Mukami McCrum

Source: British Library

Mukami McCrum

All-round amazing person, Mukami McCrum has lived in Scotland most of her life. She fights for women’s rights, in particular BAME and LGBT women who need support from domestic abuse. She is one of the founders of Shakti Women’s Aid and campaigns to end Female Genital Mutilation.

She was the chief executive of Central Scotland Racial Equality Council and has brought her deep commitment to race and gender justice to many organisations, including Akina Mama wa Afrika, World Council of Churches, Responding to Conflict Trust. She has an MBE for her community and human rights work.

Continue reading

The Poet and the Doctor, Craiglockhart War Hospital 1917 (War Poets Collection)

Craiglockhart War Hospital March 1917  Image courtesy of Edinburgh Napier University

The month of March includes two important dates in the calendar for the War Poets Collection at Craiglockhart Campus, as we mark the birthday’s of the celebrated poet  Wilfred Owen (born 18th March 1893) and the eminent psychiatrist and anthropologist, Dr William Rivers (born 12th March 1864)

At our Craiglockhart campus, the original building was used as a military hospital during the First World War.  The hospital treated around 1801 officers, suffering mostly from neurasthenia  , or war neurosis, between 1916-1919. Neurasthenia was more commonly known at the time as shell shock.

Craiglockhart old frontage

Craiglockhart old frontage

Those of you who studied English literature at school may be familiar with Wilfred Owen, the WW1 soldier-poet, as his works are taught not only in the UK  but in many other countries around the world.  2nd Lt. Owen was to become one of the leading poets of the First World War.  He was treated at Craiglockhart War Hospital for shell shock during the summer months of 1917.  Wilfred was in the care of Dr (Capt.) Arthur Brock, who treated his patients using ergo-therapy, or the “work cure”.  More than a century later, the University’s Occupational Therapy students provide us with a contemporary link to Dr Brock’s work.

Wilfred Owen Bust. Sculpture by Anthony Padgett.

Many of Wilfred Owen’s  poems, such as Anthem for Doomed Youth and Dulce et Decorum Est  were drafted or composed whilst he was a patient and he edited six issues of the hospital magazine, The Hydra.  Wilfred Owen recovered his health and returned to the Front but was killed on active service on the 4th November 1918, just one week before the Armistice was declared.

Image of Hydra Magazine

The recently discovered missing copies of The Hydra magazine.

One of the most recognised names in English anthropology and psychiatry is that of Doctor William H R Rivers, born in Chatham, Kent on 12th March 1864.  William Rivers qualified as a doctor from the University of London and St Bartholomew’s Hospital at the tender age of twenty-two, the youngest graduate until recent times. You may recognise the hospital, as the Duke of Edinburgh was treated there for a heart problem recently. Rivers lectured at the University of Cambridge and was a polymath, being involved in the fields of ethnography, anthropology, medicine and psychiatry.

Dr Rivers joined the Royal Army Medical Corps during the First World War and was appointed Senior Psychiatrist at Craiglockhart War Hospital.  Dr (Capt.) Rivers was an extremely popular member of the medical team at the hospital, using dream analysis and the talking cures to help his patients. He is best known in literary circles as being the doctor who treated the poet Siegfried Sassoon at Craiglockhart. Dr Rivers returned to academia after the war but died in June 1922.

You can find out more about both these men in the War Poets Collection at Craiglockhart (University Covid-19 restrictions apply at the moment) or visit our website at www.napier.ac.uk/warpoets

By Catherine Walker

© 2021 The Library Blog

Theme by Anders NorénUp ↑