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Category: Celebrations (Page 2 of 5)

Happy Birthday Mickey Mouse

November 18, 2023

Happy Birthday Mickey Mouse

Who’d have thought the creation of a character with small stature and a plucky attitude would go on to become a household name and a global sensation symbolising hope, optimism, courage, resilience, positivity in the face of adversity, friendship and connection, creativity, imagination, perseverance, and leadership. The list of his attributes is endless.

The History of Mickey Mouse

Created by Walt Disney and Uniwerks at Walt Disney Studios, Micky Mouse made his debut appearance on November 18th, 1928, in the black and white feature film Steamboat Willie. It was the first animation synchronized to music and sound effects and premiered in New York.  Mickey’s first appearance and his unique characteristics and behaviour caught the audience’s imagination and connected him deeply in the hearts and minds of the American people during the great Depression.

The idea for Mickey Mouse came when Walt Disney lost creative control over his earlier creation, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, whilst working for Universal Studios. Similarities between the two characters can be seen in the early days.

Mickey Mouse Fandom

However, through the ages Mickey went on to become the most recognizable and loved mascots of Disney Characters and appeared on a range of merchandise, comic strips and inspiring the theme park, Disney Land. In fact, People became so absorbed in the character that they began to ask more in-depth questions, to understand what made Mickey Mouse who he was, and to understand his appeal to so many people from around the world. Questions included:

  • What’s Mickey’s middle name?
  • What’s Mickey’s favourite food?
  • What were his first words he spoke?
  • Is Minnie Mouse his girlfriend?
  • Is Mickey Mouse married?

Do you know the answer to any of those questions?

Legacy of Mickey Mouse

Did you also know he was the first cartoon character to speak, and the first cartoon character to earn a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame? Back during the time of single-cell animation, Mickey Mouse cartoons could take anywhere from 6 months to 2 years to complete and a seven-and-a-half-minute animation could include more than 10,000 drawings.

In 1935 the film Bad Concert saw Mickey’s transition into the world of technicolour. In 1993, Mickey Mouse’s toon town opened in Disneyland. And in 2024 Mickey appeared in his CGI form, in Mickey’s Twice upon a Christmas.

It’s true to say that Mickey Mouse means a lot to many different people. And his character has been analysed for its mass appeal and its symbolism. With so much information out there for you to peruse through and an incredible legacy of his own, all that remains to be said is……

Happy 95th birthday, Mickey Mouse

Why not head on over to Box of Broadcast and see the documentary about Walt Disney.

by Mo Almas

From one pop culture to another, read about Barbie

Photo source by Brian McGowan

International Student Day 2023

International Student Day 2023

International Student Day is celebrated on the 17th of November. A day to celebrate our diverse student community. Student life can be difficult to navigate for anyone, but international students face challenges. We want to raise awareness and offer support.

Origins of International Student Day

This is a day of commemoration. On this day in 1939, Nazis stormed the University of Prague. The students who stood up and resisted were rounded up and arrested,9 student leaders were killed and more than 1200 students were sent to concentration camps. In 1941, the Council of International Students in London chose this day to celebrate international students. (Studyinternational.com)

It has now become a ‘’nonpolitical celebration of the multiculturalism of their international students’’ (Wikipedia). Therefore, it has become an occasion to ‘celebrate all students, especially those who have gone to great lengths to attain further education’ (daysoftheyear).

International Students and Edinburgh Napier University

We’ve welcomed students from more than 180 countries.

If you are looking to move to Edinburgh and study at Napier University, you can find out more information here on how we can support you as an international student.  And we have more information on starting the processing. And if you are already studying here, you can find out the support Napier offers.

International Students and the Library

For any student, libraries can be daunting. We’ve created a little guide filled with information on using our libraries. You can find on the library webpages. This covers both using the library online or in-person. And remember, if you need any help, library staff are here to help, you can email (library@napier.ac.uk) or call (0131 455 3500) or visit the help desk.

We have a training and events calendar that highlights useful sessions, and you can always for a personalised library tour.

And you can read more on library information on the blog.

A History of Halloween

A History of Halloween

Origins of Halloween

The origins of Halloween can be traced back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain. Celebrated from around 2,000 years ago. Samhain is a festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter. It is a time when the boundary between the living and the dead is believed to be at its thinnest. Celts would light bonfires and wear costumes to ward off ghosts and other malevolent spirits that were thought to roam the earth during this time. The festival was an opportunity to honour ancestors and seek their guidance for the coming year.

With the spread of Christianity, the festival of Samhain was gradually incorporated into Christian traditions. In the 8th century, Pope Gregory III designated November 1st as All Saints’ Day, a day to honour saints and martyrs. This was followed by All Souls’ Day on November 2, a day to pray for the souls of the deceased. The Christian influence on Halloween led to the practice of trick-or-treating, which originated from the medieval practice of “souling,”. Where poor people would go door-to-door on All Souls’ Day, offering prayers for the dead in exchange for food.

Despite the Christian influence, many pagan traditions and beliefs associated with Samhain continued to be practised, particularly in Ireland and Scotland. Halloween was brought to the United States by Irish and Scottish immigrants in the 19th century. Today, Halloween is a popular holiday celebrated in many countries around the world, with various customs and traditions that reflect its diverse origins. The holiday has become a time for dressing up in costumes, carving pumpkins, and indulging in sweet treats.

Halloween Traditions

The holiday as it is celebrated in the West today has its own unique traditions that have developed over time. Celebrations often feature bobbing for apples, trick-or-treating, making Jack-o’-Lanterns, wearing spooky costumes  and telling scary stories

While some of these traditions have their roots in ancient practices, others have been adapted and evolved over time. For example, the tradition of bobbing for apples can be traced back to a Roman festival honouring Pomona, the goddess of agriculture and abundance. Similarly, the practice of carving pumpkins into Jack-o’-Lanterns has evolved from the original practice of carving turnips and other root vegetables. Personally, I would avoid trying to carve a turnip as it’s nearly impossible and takes forever!

Halloween Celebrations Around the World

Dia de los Muertos

Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is a Mexican holiday that takes place on November 1st and 2nd. This festival is a time for families to remember and celebrate their loved ones who have passed away. It is believed that on these days, the souls of the departed return to the world of the living to be with their families. The holiday is marked by colourful parades, elaborate costumes, and offerings of food and drink for the deceased. While often compared to Halloween, Dia de los Muertos has its own unique traditions and cultural significance.

Guy Fawkes Night

Guy Fawkes Night, also known as Bonfire Night or Fireworks Night, is a British holiday that takes place on November 5th. You can read all about it in our article here. This holiday commemorates the failed attempt by Guy Fawkes and his associates to blow up the Houses of Parliament in 1605. The holiday is marked by bonfires, fireworks displays, and the burning of effigies of Guy Fawkes. While not directly related to Halloween, the holiday shares some similarities in terms of its focus on fire and celebration.

World Festivals

Halloween-like festivals are found in many other countries around the world. Furthermore, each has its own unique traditions and cultural significance. In Romania, for example, the Day of Dracula is celebrated on Halloween. It involves costume parties and reenactments of scenes from Bram Stoker’s Dracula. In Hong Kong, the Hungry Ghost Festival takes place in August and September. It involves offerings of food and drink to appease the spirits of the dead. While these festivals may share some similarities with Halloween, they are distinct celebrations that reflect the unique cultural traditions of their respective countries.

Want to learn more about spooky history? Why not check out our resources on Librarysearch.napier.ac.uk

By Juliet Kinsey

Image: Photo by David Menidrey on Unsplash

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National Poetry Day

National Poetry Day 5th October 2023

Today is National Poetry Day, a celebration that has been marked on the first Thursday of October since its inception in 1994. William Sieghart is a publisher whose stated aim is to help people “drop their fear of the p-word” . To that end, Sieghart founded this celebration of excellence in poetry, and since that first day,  NPD has reached an audience of more than 500 million people.

The celebration is not yet 30 years old, but poetry itself is as old as humanity. It may, in fact, be our oldest form of artistic expression; it certainly predates literacy. The word poetry comes from the ancient Greek poieo meaning “I create”, and humans have been creating down the centuries, using poetry to articulate every emotion as well as to record oral histories, and important events, to entertain and to offer prayer.

There are dozens of different types of poetry, from haiku to limerick, ode to epic.  But maybe you prefer one of the more modern free-verse forms. Maybe you’ve even had a go a writing a few of them yourself.  If you’d like to test your poetry skills on a wider audience, why not check out the various competitions currently open for submission. Find out more here:

National Poetry Library Competitions

The theme of this year’s National Poetry Day is Refuge.  Read more about the theme here:

About National Poetry Day – National Poetry Day

Library Resources for National Poetry Day

Of course, we have a huge range of poetry resources that you can access via LibrarySearch.

LibrarySearch Library Catalogue 

We have books on how to read it, how to write it, how the greats do it, and why it matters. We also have access to the Poetry Archive which houses recordings of poets reading their own work out loud. It features the works of contemporary poets alongside historic records of Seamus Heaney, W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot and many others.  Of course, we may be biased, but we believe that one of the best poems within the archive, is Library Ology, written and presented by Benjamin Zephaniah. You can listen to it here:

Library Ology – Poetry Archive

Or how about checking out Poets on Screen, a library of 879 video clips of poets reading their own and other poets’ work. We may be biased, but we love this tender and moving poem – The Keepsake – written and read here by Fleur Adcock (spoiler alert – it features witty librarian jargon).

The Keepsake Read by Fleur Adcock – Literature Online – ProQuest

Learn more about the power of reading in our post on International Literacy Day.

By Lesley McRobb

 

Image source: Unsplash Álvaro Serrano

National Bakewell Day

National Bakewell Tart Day

The flaky, buttery pastry, a good amount of jam and sweet frangipane and the little cherry on top literally is the cherry on top. It’s the Bakewell tart, a legend among baked goods, a classic in baking. National Bakewell tart day is a new celebration, only starting in 2020. Grab a Bakewell tart and let’s get into this delicious day.

History of the Bakewell Tart

Bakewell Tart is accredited to Mrs Graves, the landlady of the White House Inn in Bakewell, Derbyshire England. It was originally called Bakewell Pudding. It was referred to as a pudding due to the original recipe. The cooks were asked to make a jam tart but instead of putting the almond paste into the pastry, they put it on the jam. This created an egg custard which resembled a pudding.

The date of creation is debated, some cite it as early 1820, while others claim 1860. However, it is found in a cookbook dated 1845. From 1900, the Bakewell pudding became the Bakewell Tart. This was mainly due to the egg custard being replaced by a frangipane. Soon a cherry topped, and it became the ‘Cherry Bakewell’. Finally, they were made smaller and became individual. It became the Bakewell Tart that we know today.

Additional Reading

Read about more days of the year here

In the mood for some cooking or baking, check out each well-being collection at our libraries for some cookbooks.

 

Photo source Alan Stephenson

Lughnasa Celtic Harvest Festival

Lughnasa Celtic Harvest Festival

Lughnasa is one of four traditional Celtic harvest festivals.  It happens at the end of summer when the grains are ripening, but have not yet been harvested. Usually celebrated on the 1st of August, it marks the end of summer and the beginning of the second half of the year. It occurs halfway between the summer solstice and autumn equinox.

A History of Lughnasa

Lughnasa is an ancient Gaelic holiday, said to be in honour of the pagan god Lugh, and his mother Tailtiu. As well as the usual traditions of feasting and gathering, it is believed that this was when the Tailteann Games were held. Games included “the long jump, high jump, running, hurling, spear throwing, boxing, contests in swordfighting, archery, wrestling, swimming, and chariot and horse racing. They also included competitions in strategy, singing, dancing and story-telling, along with crafts competitions for goldsmiths, jewellers, weavers and armourers.”[Source]

Lughnasa is still celebrated today in Ireland as a holiday. It includes music, dancing, stories and crafts. Furthermore, One modern-day legacy of Lughnasa is “Reek Sunday”. This involves climbing up a mountain or hill. In Ireland, many people climb up Croagh Patrick in Co. Mayo., also known as “the Reek” hence the name “Reek Sunday.”

The Myth

The myth that Lughnasa is based on according to Máire MacNeill who wrote on it back in1962 is the following:

“[it involves] a struggle for the harvest between Lugh and Crom Dubh, another mythical god who stores the grain, which Lugh seizes for humanity. Often, this is portrayed as a struggle for ‘Eithne,’ a woman who symbolizes the grain. Also, Lugh combats and destroys another figure representing blight. ‘Óenach Tailten’ or ‘Aonach Tailteann’ was a ceremony held during Lughnasadh in commemoration of Tailtiu [Lugh’s mother].” Source  

The four feast days

As well as Lughnasa, there is Samhain, Imbolg and Beltane. These are all based on the harvest periods and seasons. Samhain is celebrated on the 31st of October and is linked to Halloween celebrations. People leave gifts for the dead to appease their spirits and festivities and bonfires are often lit. Imbolc or Imbolg is celebrated on the 1st of February and is a lesser know celebration. It marks the beginning of spring and rebirth of the land. The final festival, and a very big one for Edinburgh is Beltane. It happens on the first of May and involves a lot of dancing and bonfires. Why not visit Edinburgh this year and attend our Beltain event on the top of Carlton Hill.

Read more on Scottish history at librarysearch.napier.ac.uk

By Juliet Kinsey

Photo by Polina Rytova on Unsplash

Read more on Scottish history and Festivals with articles on:

The Edinburgh Festival

World Chocolate Day

World Chocolate Day: Friday 7th of July 2023

Take a moment to indulge in World Chocolate Day!  

Did you know that approximately 1 billion people from around the world eat chocolates every day?  

This just shows that many of us cannot resist the temptation of chocolaty treats. Indeed chocolate is also the food of love! You might think chocolate is unhealthy, however dark chocolate has many health benefits. It creates a calm and happy mood, improves memory and even helps to keep that heart healthy… but remember everything in moderation! 

What is the story of chocolate? 

Chocolate begins from the pods of the cacao tree and is native to Central and South America. Pods g from the trunk and in the larger branches, which contain the cacao beans.  

Did you know cacao is the botanical name for the unfermented beans and cocoa is the manufactured product?  You can find more about the cocoa bean via our Library Search here: 

History of Chocolate

Chocolate can be traced back to the Mayans. It was consumed in liquid form for celebrations and complimented most meals. It was often combined with chillies, water and honey.  Furthermore, The Aztecs also believed that chocolate was sacred and used the cacao beans as currency- in fact, it was more valuable than gold!  

During the industrial revolution, chocolate boomed. Half of the cacao butter was removed for the chocolate liquor and resulting in a creamier and improved quality. It was the modern era for cost-effective, machine-based chocolate. 

John Cadbury opened the first shop in Birmingham in 1824 and has manufactured chocolate since. Due to the machinery, different types of chocolate have emerged and today it is a highly refined, edible confectionary.   

Fair-trade chocolate  

Fairtrade Chocolate supports changing the way cocoa is supplied, ethical working conditions and sustainable incomes for farmers and their families. You can recognise the fairtrade on products like this one below: 

Find more about Fair Trade here: https://www.fairtrade.org.uk/Buying-Fairtrade/Chocolate/ 

Read more on Chocolate using LibrarySearch.napier.ac.uk

Let us know which is your favourite chocolate bar in the comments below?  

Find more information  

https://nationaltoday.com/world-chocolate-day/  

https://www.history.com/topics/ancient-americas/history-of-chocolate  

Image by: shri-wntFdvFPu5I-unsplash

Happy Fourth of July Independence Day🎉

Happy Fourth of July Independence Day🎉

Also referred to as Independence Day, the Fourth of July marks the anniversary of the then 13 colonies declaring independence from the British crown. It has a rich history of celebrations throughout the United States.

On July 2nd 1776, the then continental congress voted for independence. Consequently, two days later the 13 colonies adopted the declaration of independence. Thomas Jefferson famously drafted the document. The Fourth of July has been celebrated ever since. Fun fact, as it was the 2nd of July that congress passed the decision on Independence, future President John Adams refused to celebrate American independence on the fourth of July and marked celebrations on the second. He would die fifty years later on July 4th 1826 (History.com).

Celebrations range from family barbecues to street parades. In addition, firework displays are notorious and have been part of celebrations since 1777, with the first reported in Philadelphia. Early celebrations included having mock funerals for King George III, and the firing of muskets and cannons.  These were followed up by a public reading of the declaration of independence (History.com). In 1870, it was recognised by Congress as a federal holiday, although it was not until 1941, that it would be a paid holiday for federal employees. It was in the late 19th century with the rise of leisure time that family get-togethers and barbecues became more common celebrations (History.com)

Whatever you are doing this year have a happy fourth of July Independence Day!

Read about other celebrations on our blog such as St.Patricks Day and Chinese New Year

Want to learn more about American History? Try Librarysearch.napier.ac.uk for all sorts of information. Need to know how to use it? Read our Guide here.

By Maya Green

Photo by Paul Weaver on Unsplash

 

 

 

Global Beatles Day

Global Beatles Day

June 25th

Good morning, Good morning, Twist and shout! it’s the 25th of June. So grab your magical mystery tour ticket to ride, because it’s Global Beatles Day. Furthermore, there’s not a blue meanie insight. So whether you’re a beautiful dreamer or day tripper. Take a swift step back in musical time to find out more about Global Beatles Day.

Can you dig it?

This unofficial holiday is an opportunity for people from all around the world to come together and celebrate the lasting impact the Beatles have had on music history, pop culture and the lives of generations of music lovers. The Band is regarded as the most influential group of all time, a leader of the era’s youth and social movements and influenced the counterculture of the 1960s.

Their experimentation with recording techniques and musical styles resulted in popular music being accepted as an art form. They revolutionised numerous areas of the music industry through pioneering recording techniques, songwriting and artistic presentation. So, if you’re a fan, or you’ve never heard of the Beatles, now’s the perfect time to delve into their work.

The back story: A beginning almost like it was Yesterday:

In 1956 the Band came to the attention of Brian Epstein, a local Liverpool record store manager. He saw their talent and potential for mass appeal. It wasn’t long before the world would be introduced to the Beatles, and the frenzy-based mania they would cause, which UK press aptly went on to call Beatlemania. But first, the band needed a recording deal, which was secured with Parlophone, a subsidiary of the giant EMI group of music labels.

Do you want to know a secret?

Once signed with Parlophone, George Martin became the band’s producer. He was referred to as the fifth Beatle, because of his in-depth involvement with each of the Beatle’s original Albums. Also, he suggested firing drummer Pete Best, who’d been part of the group since 1960. Subsequently replacing him with Ringo Starr, who was a more seasoned drummer.

The boys were also fondly referred to as the Fab 4: Though Lennon and McCartney had been performing together since 1957, with various individuals and changing band names from Quarry Men to the Silver Beatles. Paul McCartney, John Lennon, Ringo Starr, and George Harrison recorded together for the first time in 1962.

I’ve got a feeling:

Try to act naturally, but the fans just couldn’t, the mayhem the band caused just by being present here, there and everywhere brought with it an unprecedented level of chaos. The band first appeared on British Television in 1963 and Brain Epstein’s hunch about the band’s mass appeal was correct. Additionally, their songs, popularity and influence made them the centre of attention and admiration for the hopes and dreams of a generation, that came of age in the 60s, and had something to say.

Getting better

A year later they took the states by storm, appearing on American Television and flying high in pop culture. The level of their popularity is encapsulated in the Beatles film A Hard Day’s Night

Here Comes The Sun:

Notably, June 25, 1967, was seen as the pinnacle of “The Summer of Love”, and saw the first-ever live global satellite television link to 26 countries worldwide, broadcasting the BBC’s Our World programme to an audience of 400 million viewers. With none other than the Beatles attending to perform “All you need is Love”. It was for this very reason the first Global Beatles Day was celebrated on June 25th 2009, by Beatles fan Faith Cohen. Faith referred to the idea as “a thank you or love letter to The Beatles”. This idea proved to be a popular means by which fans worldwide, old and new, continue to connect and celebrate the musical legacy of the Beatles.

Goodbye, the end:

I guess all things must pass, and this is where I must leave you. The band formally broke up in 1970. The group members did go on to have solo hits and collaborate with other artists. But don’t let this stop you, because, like many people worldwide, you can listen to the Beatles anytime at all. There’s a wealth of information out there on the band and its members.

If you’re a student or lecturer check out bob (Box of Broadcasts) to watch some of the Beatle’s films or documentaries like:

  • A Hard Day’s night
  • Help!
  • Magical Mystery Tour
  • The Yellow Submarine
Just for fun

If you had to pick 3 of your favourite Beatles songs which, would they be?

Having read the blog, did you spot The Beatles song titles hidden in the text, what are they? and how many are there?

By Mo Almas

——

Thinking about studying a music course, why not look at what Napier University has to offer in Music study

Read more on our blog with articles like:

Image SOurce: Photo by Fedor on Unsplash

International Faerie Day

International Faerie Day: A Scottish History

So, before we go any further. One thing…don’t call them Faeries! For they most certainly do not like it. Fair folk is fine but remember to show the utmost respect as they enjoy playing tricks on humans and take very badly to perceived slights. Though there is the odd kind faerie, most of them are mischievous at best, and terrifying at worst.

Scotland and Faerie History

In Scotland, Fairies are traditionally called Seelie or Unseelie from the word ‘seilie’ in Scots, which means Happy or Lucky (source). Also known by the fair folk, elevs, good people and many other names. In Gaelic they were called Daoine Sith meaning ‘people of peace’ (not because they were peaceful mind, but as an act of fearful respect).[1] In Gaidhealtachd, the Scots Gaelic oral storytelling tradition they were called the “still folk” or “silently moving people,” spelt SITH and pronounced SHEE [2].

We have mentions of them throughout the last 1000 years of recorded history, which is pretty incredible. Some of our earliest sources are from poems like Thomas the Rhymer, Tam Lin and The Elfin Knight.

Protection

Throughout Scottish History, there are many records of Faeries being blamed for people’s misfortune, from crops failing and cream curdling to lost children.

To protect themselves superstitions grew around how to protect oneself. Wearing rowan berries or decorating your home with them was one. Carrying Iron was another. There were also the acts of Saining or maistir. Saining involves the burning pine cones or metal-imbued water being sprinkled over a new mother and her child. Maistir, a rather more unpleasant choice involved stale urine. This was placed on windows and doors to keep out Faeries…and everyone else probably [3].

It was believed that every source of water from a well to a loch had its own Faerie protector. One must appease these protectors with gifts and respect. This is perhaps why we find so many precious items from the past in them.

Famous Scottish Fair Folk

Apart from Nessie, is any other creature more famous in Scotland now than The Kelpies? The stunning sculptures pay homage to a terrifying creature, half man, half horse. Said to trick the unwary into rides on his back, only to drag them into the water and drown them. Gulp!

The sad tales of Selkies are another well-spun story. Beautiful creatures who take on human form when they remove their seal-like skin. Humans would fall in love with them and trap them by hiding their skins. Preventing the Selkies from returning to their homes. These tales always end in heartbreak when the Selkie finally frees itself and returns to the water where it belongs.

A lesser-known being (I only heard about them when researching this article!) is the Scottish Faerie Vampire. Baobhan Sith. Known to devour their male victims and take their hearts [4].

Not that they were all bad! Wee sprites and Brownies would favour children and help them out in times of peril. The well-known Ghillie Dhu or Gille Dubh was thought to be a kindly sort, devoted to children.

Places to visit

One of the best places for Faerie fun in Scotland is the Isle of Skye. With its well-known Fairy Pools and  Fairy Glen. Take a brave dip in a pool and see who you might meet! or wander the glen just as dusk falls and keep your eyes open.

Although not actual Kelpies thank goodness, Scotland’s stunning sculptural artwork of them is well worth a visit. Also, whenever you are on the coast keep your eyes peeled for both Selkies and Kelpies, but don’t get too close.

No matter where you are in the Scottish countryside, you will find faerie circles hidden in woods or mystical glens to wander through. Just keep your wits about you or you could disappear into the faerie court for 100 years in the blink of an eye!

By Juliet Kinsey

Library Resources

Read more about the subject of Faeries on Librarysearch.napier.ac.uk.

How about this article by Moir Marquis, Otherworld Here: On the Ecological Possibilities of Faeries

or this book: The Virtue of Temperance in the Faerie Queene

To learn about all things fairytale and Celtic, read The Golden Bough.

Why not learn more about History in our blog post on May Day?

References

[1]Henderson, L. & Cowan, E.J., 2001. Scottish fairy belief: a history, East Linton: Tuckwell Press

[2] & [3] https://www.guide-collective.com/gc-magazine/fairies-the-still-folk-of-scotland

[4] https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/15583075.scottish-myths-legends-vampire-fairies-shape-shifting-selkies-loch-ness-monster/

Sources

https://www.scotland.com/blog/faeries-in-scottish-folklore/

https://www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk/stories/fairy-belief-fairy-tales-scotland

https://www.guide-collective.com/gc-magazine/fairies-the-still-folk-of-scotland

https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/15583075.scottish-myths-legends-vampire-fairies-shape-shifting-selkies-loch-ness-monster/

https://www.nordicvisitor.com/blog/mythical-scotland-exploring-the-legends/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghillie_Dhu

 

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