Edinburgh Napier University

Author: julietkinsey (Page 2 of 13)

Spanish Christmas Traditions

A Spanish-style Traditional Christmas 

Christmas in Spain is not so very different from Christmas elsewhere, but there are one or two traditions that may sound slightly exotic to Scottish ears, and I’ll set them out here.

First of all, our festive period is longer, running from the 22nd of December until the 7th of January. We celebrate the end of Christmas with presents brought from faraway lands by the Three Wise Men (traditionally marked by the Epiphany). This, of course, makes the youngest members of the family very merry, but it pleases the grownups too. Traditionally Santa Claus has never been recognised in Spain, but nowadays that is changing, and like the reyes mago” (3 wise men), he now sometimes brings presents too.

The Spanish Lottery

A more recent, and much more secular tradition, is El Gordo, the Spanish Christmas Lottery. This, too, is celebrated on the 22nd of December. It’s the most popular draw of the year in Spain and is considered the biggest worldwide since it was first celebrated in 1812. Winning El Gordo’s jackpot is one of the best Spanish Christmas presents you could hope for.

As in many other parts of the world, Christmas trees, fancy city lights, and splashes of red, green, and white decorations make their appearance during the festive period. However, something quite particular we have is the Portal de Belén: tiny models of Bethlehem representing the Nativity, with many accompanying structures such as the desert, town, angels, shepherds and farm animals.

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Jane Austen Day

Jane Austen Day

Picture, if you will, a walnut tripod table by a window in a country house. It’s tiny, with twelve sides and a moulded edge. Imagine a small figure writing at this table in secret, on small scraps of paper, alive to the sounds of footsteps carrying visitors into the room. Notice as this person swiftly hides those scraps away from prying eyes. The image you now have in your mind is that of Jane Austen, perhaps the best-loved author in the English-speaking world. Imagine a world without those scraps and their transformation into the six sparkling novels that she completed. How impoverished that world would be.

Jane Austen: A life

Jane wrote in secret because she was a young, unmarried woman in the late 18th century, and it was considered unseemly for ladies to indulge in anything as vulgar as writing fiction.

Luckily for us, she privately pursued her literary passions throughout her tragically short life, and the novels she bequeathed us – all published within a six-year time frame – have been in print ever since. The many television and cinematic adaptations of her work attest to the fact that literary audiences today are as hungry for her work as they were 200 years ago.

Jane Austen lived a quiet, unspectacular and financially constrained life in southern England. She rarely travelled and never married, and yet her keen and witty observations of societal norms and her brilliant insights into human relationships sing out from every page of her works. Her novels were instantly popular, but she was only identified as their author a few months after she died.

Today we celebrate Jane’s birthday, and she lives on through her characters who are as fresh and modern today as they were when she wrote them into existence: Elizabeth Bennett, the Dashwoods, Fanny Price, Emma Woodhouse, Catherine Morland, and Anne Elliot.  Oh, and the dashing Mr Darcy (be still, my beating heart!)

Resources for Jane Austen Day

You’ll find all her novels on LibrarySearch.  Why not binge-read them over the holidays.

In order of publication:

Sense and Sensibility (1811)

Pride and Prejudice (1813)

Mansfield Park (1814)

Emma (1815)

Persuasion (1817)

Northanger Abbey (1817)

For more information:

The Jane Austen Society UK

Or why not check out the film adaptations on Box of Broadcasts.

By Lesley McRobb

Read more on the blog by Lesley. Such as National Poetry Day

Luciadagen (Santa Lucia Day)

Luciadagen (Santa Lucia Day)

History

On 13th December Scandinavians commemorate Luciadagen the so-called “Festival of Lights” celebrating Santa Lucia. This stems from the fourth-century martyrdom of the Italian Saint Lucia and is an important winter celebration in Scandinavian countries. In earlier centuries the Norse celebrated the winter solstice, but after converting to Christianity sometime around 1000 AD, they incorporated the legend of Santa Lucia into their celebrations. Having long, dark winters with areas above the Arctic Circle not seeing the sun for up to 2 months, may have influenced them to commemorate a saint associated with light. The modern festival combines elements of both pagan and Christian traditions.

It is believed that Lucia took food and water to Christians hiding in the catacombs of Rome to avoid persecution from the Romans who worshipped pagan gods. Being underground the catacombs were dark. Unable to carry the supplies and a lantern, legend has it that Lucia designed a version of a headlamp, wearing a wreath of candles on her head to light her way. She was killed by in 304 AD after refusing to give up her vow of chastity and marry a pagan.

Celebrations Today

Nowadays on December 13th towns in Scandinavia mark the day with a procession of children, dressed in white tunics with lit candle wreaths on their heads to symbolise Lucia’s headlamp. Younger children tend to wear imitation candles or tinsel. As the procession progresses, the song Santa Lucia is sung along with traditional songs. The procession will be led by a girl who has been chosen to be the town’s Santa Lucia. The festival is meant to bring hope and light at the darkest time of the year. At home, families observe the festival by having one of their daughters (usually the eldest) dress in white and serve lussekattar (saffron bread) and coffee to symbolize Lucia bringing food and water to those in hiding.

With strong Nordic connections, it’s not surprising that Orkney has adopted the tradition, incorporating a Santa Lucia or St. Lucy (the English version) procession into the Kirkwall  Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony.

We wish all our Scandinavian staff and students a happy Luciadagen and you can use Library Search to learn more about traditions, festivals and saints.

Let’s not forget our Italian staff and students because although the modern-day celebration of Santa Lucia is generally associated with Scandinavian countries. It is also observed in some parts of Italy, Lucia’s homeland. The feast is a Catholic celebrated holiday with roots that can be traced back to Sicily. St. Lucia is the patron saint of the Sicilian city of Syracuse.

Learn more about this using librarysearch.napier.ac.uk

Read more about Christmas traditions on out blog with the article: Spanish New Year

By Vivienne Hamilton

Photo by Photo by Dimitri Karastelev on Unsplash

The 12 Days of Festive Library Resources: Part One

The 12 Days of Festive Library Resources

Part one

To celebrate the end of the year and the beginning of the Festive holiday break we thought we’d share some of our best resources.

Below is a list of some of our best:

Day One: Librarysearch

We have to start with our trusty Library Catalogue, LibrarySearch. Found at Librarysearch.napier.ac.uk.

This is a great place to start. Remember to sign in first before you start your search.

You will find information on everything the library has available and information on how to access it. Read our guide on how to get started with LibrarySearch.

Day Two: Box of Broadcasts

On the second day of Christmas, my library gave me

BoB (Box of Broadcasts) is an innovative shared online off-air TV and radio recording service for UK higher and further education institutions. It contains over a million items including an archive of all BBC TV and radio content dating from 2007.
BoB enables all staff and students in subscribing institutions to choose and record any scheduled broadcast programme from 60+ TV and radio channels. You can also edit programs into clips, create playlists, embed clips into Moodle, share items via social media and generate reference citations.

Please note that our BoB licence is for educational purposes only, and only for use within the UK.

Box of Broadcasts is a truly fantastic database.

Visit learning on screen and use your university login to start watching.

Day Three: LibKey Nomad

This amazing tool will help you get full-text access to books and articles! You can add it as a browser extension or go to their website. It’s so good it even works on Amazon! It will tell you all the possible sources for the literature you are looking for and where to get them. Check out our Libkey guide here and watch the video below.

Day 4: Wellness

Here in the Library, we believe that looking after your physical and emotional health is just as important as your studies. So we created the Wellbeing Collection. University life can be challenging, even at the best of times. We’ve gathered together these resources in the hope that they help you feel happy, healthy and comfortable at Edinburgh Napier. Our collection covers a range of topics and includes guided self-help approaches to supporting mental health, personal development and achievement. You’ll find stories of resilience and recovery, discussions of family matters, and practical tools to help with the everyday realities of University life, such as finance and exam stress. If you have any suggestions, you can email library@napier.ac.uk

Day 5: DigiMap

Digimap is an online map and data delivery service. Digimap offers a number of data collections, including Ordnance Survey, historical, geological, LiDAR and marine maps and spatial data. You can create or interrogate a map online by selecting an appropriate base map, adding annotations and customising the content, use measurement and query tools to learn more about any study area. Download the raw spatial data in a wide range of formats for use in local GIS, CAD or image processing software.

Read more about Digimap in our blog post “Introducing DigiMap

Check out their DigiMap help guides on YouTube

Day 6: Databases

We provide 190 databases covering every imaginable subject, from engineering to art. We have you covered. You can find them all on LibrarySearch . If you need a bit of help on how to navigate, we have subject-specific Libguides to help you get a more tailored research experience.

Check in with the Blog next week for Part Two!

By Juliet Kinsey and Maya Green

A History of St Andrew’s Day

St Andrews Day 

Today is our patron saint’s day! St Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland. Although 30th November is not a national holiday, there will be various celebrations taking place in Scotland on and around that date, from ceilidhs to fun runs. 

The History of St. Andrew’s Day

St. Andrew is believed to have been born around 5AD and to have come from Bethsaida on the Sea of Galilee. He became a fisherman like his brother Peter, who later became Saint Peter. At first, he was a disciple of St. John the Baptist, but later was one of the 12 apostles of Christ. It is thought that he travelled extensively preaching in Scythia, and Thrace, and The Chronicle of Nestor adds that he preached along the Black Sea and the Dnieper River as far as Kyiv, then Novgorod in Russia. He became a patron saint of Ukraine, Romania, and Russia as well as Scotland following his death.

A 4th-century account reports Andrew’s death by crucifixion. He is said to have been crucified on an X-shaped cross, or saltire, at his own request as he felt he was not worthy of being crucified on the same type of cross as Christ. Patras (modern Patrai) in Greece claims the death took place there.

St. Jerome records that Andrew’s relics were taken from Patras to Constantinople (modern Istanbul) by the command of the Roman emperor Constantius II in 357 AD. From there, the body was taken to Amalfi, Italy (church of Sant ’Andrea), in 1208, and in the 15th century, the head was taken to Rome (St. Peter’s Basilica, Vatican City). In September 1964 Pope Paul VI returned Andrew’s head to Patrai as a gesture of goodwill toward the Christians of Greece. 

In Scotland, the town of St Andrews lies in Fife and legends prevail regarding the naming of the town. One claims that it is where Andrew came to build a church that pilgrims from all over Britain visited to pray. Another story claims that after Andrew’s death it harboured the relics of St. Andrew, which were brought here by a bishop, St. Rule, from Patras. 

How he became Patron Saint of Scotland

How Andrew became Scotland’s patron saint is also steeped in legend. A 16th-century text claims that Oengus II, king of the Picts from 820-834, vowed to make Andrew Scotland’s patron saint after Andrew appeared to him in a vision before a battle with the Angles. Oengus was told to watch for the sign of the cross of Christ in the air. Having seen a cloud formation in the shape of a saltire in the sky, his army went on to win the battle despite being heavily outnumbered, and the Picts agreed to venerate Andrew.

Scotland’s Flag

Scotland’s flag, known as the Saltire, is easily recognisable as a white cross on a blue background and the design could symbolize the clouds against the sky as seen in Oegus’s vision. This design has been in use for centuries and in 1385 the Parliament of Scotland decreed that every Scottish and French soldier (fighting against the English under Richard II) “shall have a sign before and behind, namely a white St. Andrew’s Cross”. Whatever the truth, Scotland has long been associated with St Andrew and will continue to remember him each November 30th.

By Vivienne Hamilton

Read more Posts by Vivienne such as: The Bridges of scotland

International Games Month is back

International Games Month is back!

It’s that time of year again when, between Halloween and the anticipation of Christmas, libraries all over the world celebrate International Games Month!

This initiative, which arrived in the UK from the other side of the Atlantic, more than ten years ago, has been celebrated among public, academic, health, school, and specialist libraries.

Today libraries are using games to engage, entertain and educate their users across sectors. So we didn’t want to miss the opportunity to promote games, play, libraries and learning altogether.

To do that, we have brought back some of the most popular initiatives to engage you. Furthermore, there is a chance to win some Amazon vouchers, whether you want to participate on a paper version or are a distance learner.

You’ll find links to all our activities (and Terms & Conditions for the games) here: https://libcal.napier.ac.uk/

Win an Amazon voucher! 

As in previous years, we’re giving students multiple opportunities to win an Amazon voucher!

Play online, send your completed puzzle/quiz from your university email address to library@napier.ac.uk with the subject line ‘International Games Month’. Correct entries will be entered into the draw to win a voucher.

Complete the Logie the Lion Jigsaw  

Library Words Word Search 

Again, we encourage you to give a go to the 2023 edition of our Plot Keywords Quiz! Use the keywords provided to work out the title of the book which has been made into a film!  Click on the link https://libcal.napier.ac.uk/ to access the quiz sheet.

Paper copies of the Word Search and our Plot Keywords Quiz are available at each campus library if you prefer to hand in a paper copy.

Additional Games for you to play for fun! 

A great way to brain-train yourself and get a break after studying and focusing on assignments is to take your mind off the books and enjoy our additional games to play. You will find them with the rest of the resources.

Reading List

And finally, if you want to find more useful resources on the importance of gaming, video games and effective fun learning, please check our updated Reading List.

Feedback 

We’d love to have your feedback on our International Games Month events.  Complete the feedback form with short questions to help us out!

By Emi Pastor

National Tree Week

National Tree Week

This year National Tree Week . It runs from 25th November until 3rd December and marks the start of the tree planting season. It’s a chance for us to celebrate our trees and, if you can, volunteer to take part in tree-planting activities. These are organized by volunteer groups and conservation bodies. If you can’t manage to do this, you may be able to find a little Tree Time to connect with trees.

Trees are an important part of ecosystems across the planet and provide food, homes and shelter for many species and help stabilize eroding riverbanks. Also, as climate change is an issue of global concern, trees can help mitigate it. By storing carbon in tree tissue and sequestering atmospheric carbon from the key greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide releases oxygen.

Background

Most of Scotland’s native tree and shrub species colonised the landscape after the last Ice Age (which ended roughly 9,000 years ago). Their seeds are dispersed by wind, water, and animals. Scotland’s native Caledonian pine forests used to cover the entire country. The landscape was dominated by ancient oaks and Scots pines, which have all but disappeared. Several events have contributed to the decline in tree numbers over millennia.

Over 4000 years ago the climate changed to become cooler and wetter. Trees were then unable to grow on higher ground. Around the same time, woodlands began to be cleared for agriculture. This has continued for centuries with even more being cleared to accommodate housing and infrastructure such as electricity pylons.

Early in the 20th century many trees were lost as part of the World War 1 war effort. Following the war and with the passing of the Forestry Act in September 1919, the Forestry Commission was founded to restore the nation’s woods and forests. The Commission bought large amounts of agricultural land on behalf of the state, eventually becoming the largest manager of land in Britain. At the time large pine plantations were established, but as time passed it became apparent that these densely planted, single-species plantations were not providing the range of tree species required to provide diverse wildlife habitats. The emphasis is now on a much wider range of species such as broadleaved and open ground specialist species.

In recent years Scotland has been battered by some severe winter storms. In particular Storm Arwen in November 2021. It is estimated about 16 million trees in Scotland were affected. Damage and loss were particularly significant in the north east and south of the country.

Furthermore, diseases such as Dutch Elm disease have wiped out many of Scotland’s trees.

The Future

Following devolution the Scottish government became responsible for forestry and set up Scottish Forestry  with its own strategies and long-term plans. The website has lots of information about our native woodlands and much more!

Here in Scotland many volunteers, conservation groups and private estates are re-planting trees. So as to try to increase tree coverage and biodiversity through the benefits trees provide. Project Laxford is taking place on the Reay Forest Estate in Sutherland. One of the aims of the project is to boost North Atlantic salmon numbers in the River Laxford. Estate workers had noticed a massive decline in numbers and one of the measures suggested by scientists was to re-generate tree coverage which had been lost along riverbanks. Salmon are sensitive to rises in water temperature which may be caused by climate change. It is hoped that tree leaves will provide shade to help the salmon, invertebrates will fall into the river from the trees. This increases food stock and dead trees and branches which fall into the river will provide a habitat for spawning and feeding. In all, one million trees are to be planted across the estate to enhance biodiversity and improve the habitat of the river and surrounding landscape.

Famous trees

Sycamore Gap Tree

It’s not often that a tree makes headline news, but the recent felling of the Sycamore Gap tree at Hadrian’s Wall did just that. Estimated to be around 150 years old the tree has been featured in TV and film productions (Robin Hood- Prince of Thieves and Vera). It was a popular photographic subject and had won England Tree of the Year in 2016. Investigations into the unauthorised felling are ongoing and there has been much anger and sadness following the event. Many people had come to the tree for special events such as milestone birthdays, marriage proposals, and to scatter loved ones’ ashes. It held great sentimental value to them. The tree has now been removed with police investigations carrying on.

The Glen Affric Elm-The Last Ent of Affric

This solitary tree is the only one of its kind in Glen Affric. Sometimes called the Last Ent after the tree creatures in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. It is thought that the tree’s remoteness has prevented it from being affected by the spread of Dutch Elm disease which has wiped out many of Scotland’s elms. It’s not known how old the tree is, but it is thought to be the last remnant of an ancient forest and was a worthy winner of Scotland’s tree of the year 2019.

The Fortingall Yew

Thought to be around 5,000 years old this ancient yew stands in the grounds of the churchyard of Fortingall in Perthshire and draws in many tourists to the area. Yew trees are either male or female and the Fortingall Yew is male. The trunk is showing signs of damage which may have been caused by ancient rights being performed around it. It was used in funerals until the 20th century when there was a practice of passing the dead body beneath its arching branches. This passing of the body beneath the arch was a way of guiding the righteous spirit into the Christian afterlife. The yew tree, although poisonous, is also associated with life and resurrection, probably because the branches can take root and regrow as trunks, like a resurrection. The pagan festival of Beltane, held on May 1 used the grounds around the Fortingall Yew as a setting for fertility bonfires. If couples wished to conceive a child, they would leap over the flames of the bonfires hand-in-hand. If they did so successfully, the legend said they would have a child. The fires took their toll on the tree causing considerable damage over the years. Further damage was caused by people taking cuttings from branches for luck. Walls were constructed to try to protect the yew, but in recent years it seems that it is suffering from stress as a branch appears to have become female after sprouting red berries in the autumn of 2015.

This demonstrates how we can have an adverse effect on our trees and makes the work being done by conservationists and volunteers even more important.

Find out more

You can find books and articles about trees and conservation using Library Search.

By Vivienne Hamilton

Image Source: Photo by Arnaud Mesureur on Unsplash

Movember: Supporting Men’s Health

Movember: Supporting Men’s Health

Calling all our Mo Bros! It’s that time of year again. We want you to embrace your facial hair and grow a moustache for a month. Movember is the global phenomenon that has put men’s health firmly on the agenda and hair firmly on their faces.

History

It’s a movement that started 20 years ago in Australia when two mates met up for a beer and joked about reviving the out-of-fashion moustache. Why not combine their challenge with raising money for charity, they asked themselves. And why not make it a men’s health charity? After all, men are notoriously reticent in talking about their health – mental or physical.

The movement was born, and since then campaigns across the world have been fund-raised for prostate and testicular cancer research and treatment, poor mental health and physical inactivity. Perhaps more importantly, it has created a fundamental shift in the way we talk about men’s health and asks the questions that were previously unuttered. Why, for example, do Black men have twice the risk of prostate cancer diagnosis than other men? Why are first responders (emergency service workers and military veterans) at increased risk of poor mental health and suicide? Why do men find it more difficult than women to make social connections and how have the COVID-19 lockdowns affected that?

Get Involved this Movember in Supporting Men’s Health

There are all sorts of ways you can support Movember. You can grow a moustache, of course, but you can also host a mo-ment – an event that raises awareness. You can fundraise at work or among classmates and friends. Or maybe you’d like to buy some Mo merch.

However you do it, we’re sure you’ll mo your own way.

See here for details on this year’s happenings:

Movember – Changing the face of men’s health – Movember

By Lesley McRobb

Image Source: Photo by Alan Hardman on Unsplash

Read more articles on Mental Health such as World Mental Health Day.

Bonfire Night and The Gunpowder Plot

Bonfire Night and The Gunpowder Plot

According to market research Company Mintel, in 2018 UK consumers spent £316m celebrating the event variously called, `Bonfire Night’, ‘Fireworks Night’ or `Guy Fawkes Night’. The majority of that money literally went up in smoke, having been spent on fireworks and bonfires. Fireworks displays were recorded as the most popular way of marking the night, with up to 38% of the population attending some form of event. 

The Gunpowder Plot

This peculiarly British annual entertainment can be traced directly to the aftermath of a 17th Century religious and political event. The Gunpowder Plot was a failed conspiracy by a group of English Catholics. Led by Robert Catesby, they planned to blow up the Protestant King James, and his government, at the State Opening of Parliament on November 6th 1605. (Catesby had been involved in a previously failed rebellion against Queen Elizabeth from which he extricated himself only at the cost in today’s money of £6 million.) 

This was to be the prelude to a revolt that would replace James with a Catholic head of state. Ending the persecution suffered by many Catholics following the split with the Roman Church over half a century previously. 

Guy Fawkes

Though we now principally associate the name of Guy Fawkes with the plot, he was a minor player in the conspiracy. He was, however, literally left holding ‘the baby’ or in this case 36 barrels of gunpowder when, following an anonymous tip-off, the authorities searched the cellars of the Palace of Westminster and discovered the explosive cache. 

This ‘search’ continues today before every State Opening of Parliament, albeit ceremonially, with the searchers, the Yeoman of the Guard, being rewarded with a glass of port.  

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Preserving the Past: My Journey Volunteering with the University Heritage Collections

Preserving the Past: My Journey Volunteering with the University Heritage Collections

Forewords

Delve into the captivating world of heritage preservation through the eyes of one talented high school volunteer. Join Charlie as he unveils his unique experiences and insights gained during his enriching half-term adventure with the Edinburgh Napier University Heritage Collections team. If you would like to consult our Collections please contact us via email

heritage@napier.ac.uk

Introduction

My name is Charlie and I am a student currently studying in my last year at Berwickshire High School. I aim to pursue history as a subject at university. Since an early age when I first began studying in high school, I have been fascinated with history and any surviving items and relics from the past. This passion was only heightened more as I studied History throughout school. This is why when I got the great opportunity to volunteer at the University Heritage Collections, I took it with no hesitation. I found many parts of my experience amazing and fascinating especially when I was working with real preserved books from as far back as the Middle Ages. This really struck my passion for history and made the whole experience worth it as the thought of holding the very same book as someone from the Middle Ages felt so strange and fascinating.

My Experience

My work while volunteering involved working with books from the Edward Clark Collection which illustrates the development of the book from the 15th century, concentrating on the development of typography, the techniques of printing illustrations, and fine bindings. My first task was to check out some of the book’s conditions and how they could be preserved better along with researching them and their origin. I also got the opportunity to spend a day of my volunteering experience doing work at the War poets’ collection which involved me getting to look at and organise real poems from soldiers who had suffered in the war. This really fascinated me as I felt like I was getting a unique chance to investigate the soldiers’ mental struggles and thoughts after their experiences on the front line. As part of my experience, I also got to complete a piece on the history of the poppy that we use for remembrance, which will support the development of a temporary exhibition. This involved looking at each type of poppy and what they mean along with the origins of the remembrance item and how it changed to become a symbol of the First World War. This really excited me as I have always found WWI to be insanely interesting and it was nice being able to research topics directly related to the war. I also got to complete tasks which involved looking at the Mehew collection, this collection is about Robert Louis Stevenson and his works which you may have heard of who’s works including books such as Treasure Island. This involved looking into the History of his works and checking up on the condition and safety of the valuable collection and implementing basic conservation measures to support delicate bindings. I also gained the chance to work with Napier’s expensive new collection scanner which I used to digitise fragile books from hundreds of years ago. Another one of my duties included Installing an exhibition about the history of Merchiston Tower and John Napier himself. Finally, my last task Included processing documentation for collection records. This taught me how to process documents and preserve important collection information for future curators and researchers to learn from.

Photo of Charlie volunteering at the special collections

Summary

I overall gained a lot from this experience which covered a wide range, this spanned from learning how to correctly handle historical records and valuable scanning equipment all the way to learning new information about historical time periods I had less knowledge on such as the Middle Ages and much more. I also was able to see just how fascinating it was to investigate the lives of those who came before us and how they lived their lives.

My experience in this volunteer position has further inspired me to study history at university and reinforced my love of the subject. It has also made me find a new interest in books and how they can be used to study the past.

As a whole, I loved my time volunteering, and it has given me tons of new experiences that will help me as I move forward to university next year.

By Charlie

Check out our Special Collection pages here.

Read more work experiences from other wonderful volunteers on the blog:

Part one Uncovering Hidden Histories: Provenance research internships in the Edward Clark Collection

Part two Uncovering Hidden Histories: Provenance research internships in the Edward Clark Collection

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